Turkey Hunting Gear List

It’s no secret hunters have lot’s of gadgets. It’s often very overwhelming preparing for a hunt and trying to decide what to bring. Each hunt, whether it be for turkey, deer, elk, or ducks, requires a slightly different set of gear. With that said, we put together a turkey hunting gear list, which will hopefully make organizing a bit easier when you prepare for your turkey hunt.


TarraStoddardDecoy (1)This is a rather large item, therefore it shouldn’t be a tough one to remember. Although, there have been plenty of instances where an obvious item like a decoy gets overlooked at the house before heading out. Unless you are planning a spot and stalk mission, this is a very important piece of equipment when going turkey hunting. If you don’t prefer to load your truck the night before, set all your equipment by the front door. This will ensure you don’t forget it.

Range Finders

DSC_0024Especially if you prefer to hunt with a bow, range finders are something you really can’t do without. A good pair of rangefinding binoculars, such as the Swarovski EL Rangefinding Binoculars, will cut down on the weight of your pack and take up less room than having to carry both optics.


Multi-ToolScreen Shot 2016-04-27 at 2.57.49 PM

A reliable Multitool should make the list no matter what type of hunt you are going on. You never know when you might need it! My personal favorite is the SOG Power Assist Multi-Tool, which can be found here.



Mother Nature can be very unpredictable in the springtime. Don’t overlook the importance of a quality jacket in case the weather turns on you. The Prois Pro-Edition Jacket is made with compressed fabric and is the perfect addition to your day pack.



NancyProisCardTurkey Call

No matter what type of call you prefer, don’t leave home without it. Unless you’re a seasoned mouth caller, you’ll be in a serious bind if you get to the woods and realize you have no way of calling birds to your decoy!




Survival/First Aid Kit

A survival kit is commonly overlooked by hunters, but when done right, it won’t add a ton of weight to your pack. A Ziplock bag with essential survival and first aid gear will do just fine. Some items to include are:

Braided nylon rope
Fire Starter
Toilet paper
Garbage Bags
Bright orange surveyor’s tape
Sterile pads
Sterile Gauze
First Aid Tape

Screen Shot 2016-04-27 at 5.00.19 PMGPS

This can be a lifesaver if you have a long walk to and from your truck. If you are in an area with reliable cell service, a smartphone will do just fine. For an affordable GPS, try the Garmin eTrex 10.


Day Pack

You will have a much Screen Shot 2016-04-27 at 2.37.06 PMeasier time keeping your gear organized if you have a reliable day pack. We recommend the Badlands Kali Day Pack, which is made specifically for women.






We hope this list helps you prepare for your upcoming turkey hunting endeavors. Good luck and happy hunting from all of us at Prois Hunting Apparel!

A Word From the CEO- Learning To Hunt Merriam’s In Colorado

By: Kirstie PIke
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women


You know, they aren’t kidding when they say that Merriams are tough hunting.  Their preference for mountainous terrain, their love for wooded cover and their disdain for dying at my hands makes them difficult at best.  While I am really giving it the college try this year by hunting solo (I have yet to harvest a Merriam) I have learned much…what I fondly call my discourse of humility and rage.  Here are my lessons learned so far…

What I have love most about hunting this bird is the perpetual spot and stalk.  I verge on ADHD and cannot sit still long.  Not to mention, the older I get the more it hurts to, well, sit.  I have found more action by setting up.  Calling a bit.  Waiting it out for some avian communication may take some time, but once you get some noise, be patient.  Don’t over call.  A lesson I am learning the hard way.  If nothing is happening, it doesn’t hurt to move on.

I have also found that spending a fair amount of time just scouting the region if the hunting is cold has been very helpful.  Locating water, roosts and feeding routes can be very helpful.

Be prepared to put on some miles.  Covering more ground gives more opportunity.  Merriams have a wide range and are considered to be turkey nomads.  It is not uncommon to put on four or five miles in a morning.

Use a locator call in the morning.  Crow or owl work well.  I am still working on honing this skill, but I have found it to be helpful.

I am a minimalist by nature.  I don’t like to pack a lot with me.  It is typically unnecessary.  Too much gear is, well, just too much.  Short of a weapon, decoy, call and binoculars I have found that a GPS with ONXMaps HUNT is invaluable.  If you are not familiar, ONXMaps can be purchased for use on your GPS or on your cell phone.  Warning- cellphone app is not helpful if you have no service.  You can purchase a card for the state you hunt and this provide very detailed mapping that allows you to know precisely where public vs private land exists.  The first time I used it I was impressed.  Had I NOT had it, I would have really limited myself on hunting area by not knowing the actual boundaries.  Not to mention, (and this is no lie) I may have had to start making a waypoint for my truck each time I go out as I tend to lose that sucker every time. In fact, I could swear that someone moves it each time I go out.  I mean, it IS possible.


I have come to rely on my GPS to mark roost trees and areas where I have found more activity.  Given the fact that the Colorado terrain is far from open and flat, it can become a bit disorienting to relocate key areas.  Directionally impaired or not, this feature saves a lot of time and frustration.

As the morning progresses, I have found that finding a high point with decent cover so I can glass the area is very helpful.  In fact, I have found birds when I was about to hang it up for the day.  If you have an entire day and don’t have to rush on to work, hang tight in the late morning and early afternoon near some open areas where you have found sign.

Now…as mentioned, these are my lessons learned to date.  I am certain I will have a million more failures before a success…so stay tuned!


Talking Technical…The Pro-Edition Vest is MADE for Turkey Season!

IMG_5472Byline By:  Kirstie Pike- CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

The Pro-Edition Vest.

This item has been a longtime top seller at Prois and it is created with technical functionality in mind.  So why is it a must have item for spring turkey hunting?  Let me count the ways…

1.  Vests are a quintessential piece of gear for spring weather.  While it can be chilly in the early morning or late evening, chances are the temperatures will climb during the day.  Vests are designed to warm the core while keeping the arms free for movement. Should you experience an unusual cold snap, the Pro-Edition vest is perfect for layering under a jacket.

2.  Windstopper.  Yep..this baby is built with a windstopping laminate which is designed to…wait for it…stop the wind!  And it does.  The very same windstopper laminate also creates water resistance until the garment does indeed get saturated.

3.  Scapular Drop Pockets.  Say what?  The Pro-Edition vest has a pocket in the liner of the vest located between the shoulder blades.  We developed this pocket to house activated handwarmers to be placed between the shoulder blades.  This particular area on the body is highly vascular as vessels run close to the surface.  Warming this region helps warm the body faster.

4.  Lumbar Pocket.  This is my favorite feature during spring turkey hunting.  I tend to not want to carry excessive gear and packs if I can avoid it.  I can put calls, masks, gloves…pretty much any small items in this pocket while I am on foot.  If you prefer carrying a turkey vest…no problem. You can put your sandwich in the pocket.  Just don’t forget about it.  That’s a story for another time.

5.  Let’s face it.  The dang thing looks great!

6.  SALE!  Holy heck…this vest is currently ON SALE now!  I would highly recommend you check this out!  It is available in Realtree APX, Realtree Max1 and Mothwing Mountain Mimicry!  Sizes XS-XXL!  Go on…check it out!  http://www.proishunting.com/shop/clearance/pro-edition-vest/





Ain’t Too Proud to Beg

by Nancy Rodriguez

The first day of spring turkey season is always magical. As I climb under the low tree branches in the dark, I know today will be a great day in the field. I am hunting after all! My decoys are set 20 yards out, ready for some action. I take my stand in the twilight. I quietly adjust myself in the tall, damp grass and slowly place twigs and branches around me for extra concealment. I lean against a mighty oak tree with my backpack next to me and shotgun across my lap. I have my arsenal of turkey calls ready to start their love songs.

As the curtain of darkness starts to rise, I am greeted with the beauty of spring. The new leaves on the trees are fluorescent green and dew sparkles across the blades of grass all around. Birds are singing back and forth, as a butterfly feeds on a lupine flower at my feet. Suspended from “my” oak tree hangs a shiny thread with an oak worm attached to it. It is gently swinging in the morning breeze. Is there anything better than this?

I start with the first song on my playlist…”Love Me Tender.” My slate call sounds great. I hope a gobbler recognizes this song and gobbles. Hmmm…Nothin! Again…Nothin!!! OK, I change the song. Mouth call in for the next song…”I’m Too Sexy”… Nothin!!! I switch between these two songs for a couple of hours and no action. Damn Birds!!!

As I quiet back down, my right bum cheek starts to go numb. My nose is running to who knows where, and I have a flock of not turkeys around me, but mosquitoes! Only my eyes are showing a small amount of flesh and of course a mosquito finds it. As I realize I’m getting nailed right on my eyebrow, my left bum cheek goes numb. I have an oak worm inching across my knee, and a spider crawling across the rim of my hat. I slowly flick off my buddies just as a gnat flies right into my eyeball. Direct hit! I rub most of him out except for what feels like his left wing. Serves him right! Where’s my turkey? Damn birds!!

Okay, time to bust out my go to song. I use this only when all else fails. As I break out my box call, I am really ready for some action! I shift on my now completely numb bum and try not to think about my itchy eyebrow. I sniff my runaway bogey nose, blink my eye with a floating gnat appendage in it, and notice there are oak worms dropping down on me like paratroopers! Time to get this show on the road!

Next song up…”Ain’t to Proud to Beg.” As I hit the chorus-GOBBLE, GOBBLE, GOBBLE! Yeah baby!! I turn up the sound and hit it again…“I AIN”T TO PROUD TO BEG”. GOBBLE, GOBBLE, GOBBLE! This time he’s closer. I aim my barrel in the direction of the gobble and with my adrenaline pumping, I wait. I watch the tall grass for any sign of movement, and pray I will see a glowing red head appear. He moves closer and closer, gobbling as he tries to find the hen singing a song no mother would approve of. I line up my fluorescent orange bead on the beautiful red head that magically appears and pull the trigger. Poor thing, he didn’t stand a chance.

A Prois chick playing “Ain’t to Proud to Beg” gets them every time!!!

NancyTurkeyN Turkey

The Art of Layering…And We Aren’t Talking About Cake.

By: Kirstie Pike- CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel

Although we really like cake. And gummies. And Sour Patch Kids.

IMG_5472 Layering is indeed the key to optimal thermoregulation and performance no matter what type of hunting you are doing. There is a common belief that layering only matters on high impact exertional hunts. Not true…not true.

Despite the fact that we at Prois like to talk tech when it comes to layering and optimizing your gear…it really is as simple as 1,2,3.

1. Baselayer
2. Insulate
3. Shell
See. Totally easy.

I know this now takes the wind out of our sails and reduces the amount of verbiage we can throw at you but this is all you need to keep in mind when choosing gear for your next outing. Since turkey season is upon us, let’s carve it up like so…

1. Baselayer: You will want full arm coverage for camouflage. A fabric choice that provides wicking is best as temperatures can fluctuate from cold to hot in hours during this season. I am personally a huge fan of merino wool and love our Icebreaker products for this. However, merino could be a bit warm in the hot climates, thus I recommend a poly birdseye blend fabric as is offered in our Ultra line of shirts. Both options will keep you covered and wick moisture. Pants. I suppose you need those as well. While they aren’t really considered a baselayer, it makes me look all smart and everything to work it into the baselayer section. Both the Pro-Edition and Ultra pants are PERFECT for turkey season. Made of the same heavy polyester tricot, the only difference between the pants is the cut. The Pro-Edition pants sit a bit higher on the waist and have elastic in the waistband and camstraps to adjust. The Ultra Pants are fashioned a bit lower on the waist and tend to have a bit more room through the thighs and hips. For that…I love the Ultras.

2. Insulate: Consider this your core. A vest is a great insulator for turkey season as it will keep you warmer in the cold morning and evening hours. I love the Pro-Edition vest for turkey season. Often I shed my jacket and use only the vest which has a huge lumbar compartment across the lower back. I stow my soft goods and calls there. I like to carry less, so I am a pocket fanatic.

3. Shell: Simply stated…this is your jacket. Your shell should provide some additional protection from the elements. Essentially, what you need is windstopping and/or waterproofing. The Pro-Edition and Generation X Jackets both provide windstopping and water resistance (NOT waterproofing) and are perfect for spring turkey hunting. Both jackets have hoods to provide additional coverage and camouflage. Both jackets are of the same fabric and the only differences are these…the Pro-Edition has a removable hood and the length of the jacket is shorter—the Generation X hood remains intact and the body of the jacket is longer. Tons of pockets and storage in both.

See…layering for turkey season is quite simple! And you know what else…most of these products are on sale RIGHT now on our website. How cool is that?? Go on…stock yourself up for this turkey season!

Talking Turkey Here…Recipes That Is!


Cheesy Turkey Pesto Rolls

Honestly…these are SO easy to make!

INGREDIENTS: 3/4 lb shredded turkey
1/4 cup Pesto of your choice
1 Tube Pillsbury crescent rolls
1 cup low fat mozzarella cheese

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF and grease a 9×13 inch baking dish with cooking spray.
  2. Roll out your crescent dough and and press into an approximately 13×18 inch rectangle, making sure to press together the seams where the crescent rolls would normally be pulled apart. Spread the rolls evenly with pesto, and then sprinkle on the mozzarella. Top evenly with slices of turkey.
  3. Starting on the long side, roll the dough up tightly. Pinch the ends together and place with the seam facing down. Cut into 9 even pieces.
  4. Place your rollups in your baking dish, evenly spaced. Sprinkle with extra mozzarella cheese if desired.
  5. Bake, uncovered, for 25 to 30 minutes until lightly browned.

Adding sundried tomatoes or artichoke hearts to this recipe offers additional flavor options!  We suggest using some of the less desirable scrapings of meat from the turkey carcass for this recipe!

Talking Turkey…Recipes That Is…

Cheesy Turkey Pesto Rolls

Cheesy Turkey Pesto Rolls!
























Honestly…these are SO easy to make! INGREDIENTS: 3/4 lb shredded turkey 1/4 cup Pesto of your choice 1 Tube Pillsbury crescent rolls 1 cup low fat mozzarella cheese

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF and grease a 9×13 inch baking dish with cooking spray.
  2. Roll out your crescent dough and and press into an approximately 13×18 inch rectangle, making sure to press together the seams where the crescent rolls would normally be pulled apart. Spread the rolls evenly with pesto, and then sprinkle on the mozzarella. Top evenly with slices of turkey.
  3. Starting on the long side, roll the dough up tightly. Pinch the ends together and place with the seam facing down. Cut into 9 even pieces.
  4. Place your rollups in your baking dish, evenly spaced. Sprinkle with extra mozzarella cheese if desired.
  5. Bake, uncovered, for 25 to 30 minutes until lightly browned.

Adding sundried tomatoes or artichoke hearts to this recipe offers additional flavor options!  We suggest using some of the less desirable scrapings of meat from the turkey carcass for this recipe!


by Joni Marie Kiser

In April I had the privilege to attend an all girls turkey hunt in Mound City, Kansas with Wheelers Whitetails. The hunt was organized by Becky Lou Outdoors and my company Rockstarlette Bowhunting was one of the hunt sponsors.  There were a total of 13 ladies that attended, split into 2 groups who hunted 3 days each. My group consisted of 3 girls from my Rockstarlette Bowhunting Pro Staff: Jayme, Ashley and Kate, some new friends Cyndie and Kerry, myself and the always energetic and fun Becky Lou.

Day 1: I am from Alaska, born and raised. I’ve hunted lots of things with my bow, but never turkeys. We don’t have turkey in Alaska so not only had I never even seen one in the wild, but I really had no idea what their calls sounded like, let alone how to make them myself with my cheap calls bought the day before! So after my first morning of sitting in a blind, we all came back to camp to regroup and have lunch. One of men who worked at the camp asked if any of us had tried to call from our blinds. I said, “I did” and got my box call to show him what I had done. He smirked, shook his head and said, “oh no!” He took the call and made a completely different sound from it. Well, I guess that’s why I didn’t see any toms! I laughed at myself and then did some practicing in front of him before heading back out so I wouldn’t scare anything off. Strike one for this Alaska girl! TurkeyHuntingSelfieJJ

Several of us were actually novices at turkey hunting. 3 of us had flown down from Alaska so everything was new to us. Ticks? They do what? We were horrified! Snakes? Brown Recluse Spiders? Hunting in Alaska and avoiding bear attacks was sounding easier and easier!  For the type of hunting that I’ve done in Alaska: black bear, brown bear, moose etc…. We don’t even use face paint (or hunt out of blinds!), so even this was a real change from the norm.  The  “Lower 48” girls in the group painted the Alaskan girls faces up for us and we headed back out. Jayme and I sat in a blind together. We saw quite a few hens and jakes (young male turkeys), but no toms.  Mike at Wheelers doesn’t allow jakes to be taken, so we were just waiting for mature toms to come in for this hunt. My calling was getting better and we got some answers back. We stayed till last light and hiked out with a pack of coyotes calls getting closer and closer as dark approached.

Day 2: 4 AM again? Good Lord. I barely got to bed and we were back at it. Of the 3 days hunt; the guides took each newbie hunter out for one 1/2 day sit in the blind with them. This morning Jayme and I split up and she went with guide David and I went with guide Mike.  My spot in the woods was near a river. We hiked in in the pitch dark. Once settled it wasn’t long before you could hear all the gobblers that were roosted on the river start to call. For someone who had never heard anything like that before, it was such an incredible experience to hear the woods “wake up”.  Eventually hens, jakes, deer  and finally 2 toms started to come in. However the toms were off to the left of the blind, angled too far back for me to see them at all. As there were no windows/openings on that side farther back. Mike was sitting to my right and could barley see them at an angle and though he called and they answered back and even were making the “drum” sound, they never did get to an angle where I could see them. Regardless, it was a cool experience and I really enjoyed learning from Mike so I headed back for lunch feeling really fulfilled. We hiked back to the truck and started to drive out. But to make things even better, when we stopped at Becky Lou’s blind she had a great Gobbler on the ground with her shot gun and when we got back to camp, Jayme had also gotten one with her bow in her blind with David! I get just as excited when my buddies get something as when I do, so I was hugging them and jumping around. Then we drove the guides crazy taking a ton of photos before finally heading back out. We each had 2 tags but Jayme, being the super loyal friend that she is, refused to hunt any more until I got one, saying she “wouldn’t feel right about it”. So we headed back out to the blind with her as my side kick.

When I had been out with Mike and he called those 2 toms in, I heard them do their drumming sound. I was floored. I had no idea that they did this and thought it was the coolest thing ever. I tried to explain it in camp to Jayme, Cyndie and Kate like this; “you know when you pull up to an intersection next to a guy in a hooptie car and he has all the windows up and all you can hear is the bass pumping and booming from inside the car?” Because that is really what it reminded me of! They looked at me like I was crazy until they each got to hear it for themselves. That night, as we sat in the blind, Jayme and I got to experience it together. First one, then two, then three, finally a total of 5 toms, all in a row came strutting up over the hill towards us and they were all “pumping bass.”  With 5 of them doing it all at once, it was vibrating the tent. We were giddy with excitement; totally in awe, gasping and smiling at each other. They never got closer than 50 yards and even then it was through the trees and I never had a shot with my bow, but it didnt matter. We left the blind that night at dark, totally elated. I didnt care if I got a turkey or not, because I had gotten to share that amazing experience with my friend. It was a once in a lifetime thing for us Alaskan girls. To me, that is really what the hunt is all about more than a trophy in the end, its the beautiful memories that you make along the way. TurkeyJoniField

That night David had headed out with Kate to her blind and Becky Lou had gone with Ashley. They didn’t get birds but learned a lot by having a seasoned turkey guide along with them in the blind. Cyndie however, came home with a beautiful, bearded hen with her shot gun. It was incredible! I don’t even think she realized how rare it was until we all told her. Extra cool for her first turkey ever!

Day 3: 4AM again and Jayme just wasn’t having it. So I let her sleep in and I went out alone. I had fun, but didn’t see any toms just lots of jakes and hens. After lunch she agreed to come back with me since it was the final night of the hunt. I had had a lot of fun on the hunt, learned a lot and seen some really cool things. I felt pretty peaceful about it. Of course I wanted to get something but ultimately I felt happy with my experience with my friends and I know that getting a turkey with a bow can be really tough so I was okay with just having a fun afternoon in the blind with my friend.  We had lots of jakes and hens come in, in fact we had 2 jakes that bedded down less than 2 ft from the blind and took a nap for hours. Then finally 2 toms came in. They were on the left side of our blind and one came right in to 10 yards but stopped right behind the metal feeder leg. He just stood there with the pole blocking him so that I couldn’t shoot. I was ready, just waiting for him to take 2 steps when I heard footsteps off to my right. A deer had come up and was beside the blind, then he winded us. He started stomping his foot and snorting; and the next thing I saw was the turkey disappearing into the brush to my left. Jayme and I looked at each other with disappointment, we thought that was going to be it! I called more and got answers from 2 directions. It was so funny, I would make a call and Jayme would whisper “oh that was such a good one”. I found it really funny that 3 days earlier we had never even heard a wild turkey call and here we now were experts on what made a “good one”.

Finally, another 2 toms came in strutting. They walked straight in and stopped at 10 yards with no obstructions. The larger one was all puffed up, but the smaller tom had mellowed out and was starting to peck corn. I’m not a trophy hunter, I enjoy hunting but I am not concerned with having the biggest or best of anything, I just enjoy the whole experience of the hunt. So I raised up to shoot the smaller tom. Mike had warned us not to shoot a turkey in strut so I was fine with taking the smaller of the 2 toms. I drew back, put my pin on him and was about to shoot when the larger one all of a sudden dropped his feathers down and started to eat. I swung my pin over to him and dropped him. He went face down in the dirt. Jayme who had been tense this whole time watching this all go down, yelled out, “Bird down! Go get em!” Super loud, scaring every other turkey, deer and raccoon that was around us. Things went running, scrambling, flying in all directions. It was hilarious chaos. I unzipped the blind and lept out and ran over to my turkey. On Jayme’s turkey she had taken a side shot through the vitals and afterward, the guide picked it up by the feet and stood on the neck to finish it off. Well we didn’t know anything about turkey hunting and my turkey wasn’t moving, just twitching, but there was no way these inexperienced Alaska girls were taking any chances! So we both ran out and each grabbed one leg, turned him upside down and stood on the neck, just in case! We were giggling and squealing. Normally on a hunt, we’d be hugging at this point but we couldn’t since we were holding up the turkey so we just head butted over top of the turkey and laughed about how Jayme scared the whole forest off with her yell.

I felt really proud that I went from Day 1 never having seen a turkey on my own, to day 3 harvesting one with my bow without a guide! I learned a lot in a short amount of time and got to spend some amazing time in the woods with girl friends. I will definitely be back to the lower 48 to try it again in the future!



*Joni Marie is owner of Rockstarlette Bowhunting and Full Curl Archery and has harvested a wide variety of big game animals with her bow.


From the Ladies Room- Talking Turkey In Texas…Say That 3 Times Fast.

Prois CEO Kirstie Pike with Greg Badgett of Double B Outfitters.  Greg is pretending to have fun...but he is not.

Prois CEO Kirstie Pike with Greg Badgett of Double B Outfitters. Greg is pretending to have fun…but he is not.

By: Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

Hunting Rios in Texas.  Who doesn’t want to do that?
Yeah, that’s what I thought…

I look forward to hunting Rios each spring with my friend and outfitter, Greg Badgett of Double B Outfitters near Ozona, Texas.  I’m not so sure he considers me a friend, but he’s not here as I write this so he can’t complain.  Sue me, Greg.

You might be asking yourself what makes hunting at the Double B so extraordinary.  You might not.  You may be asking yourself what you will make for dinner.  You might be asking yourself where you put your keys.  You might be asking yourself why anyone voted for Obama.  You might not.  But given the fact that you are still reading, I am assuming you are hanging on my every word.  Thank you.

The first time I hunted with Greg at the Double B I had only hunted turkeys a handful of times.  While I view sitting quietly for any amount of time longer than 10 minutes akin to being water boarded I do love hunting turkeys.  I had mentally prepared myself for my ritualistic turkey hunting maneuvers which include but are not limited to the following; mouth breathing, head bobbing, finding new ways to rejuvenate the blood flow to my lower extremities without any visible sign of movement and creative face paint application.  I charged my iPhone, packed a book and prepared to face the agonizing task of sitting quietly.  AKA- water boarding.

I was completely surprised when we spent the entire day on foot in hot pursuit.  We put on miles and got into turkeys left and right.  I was not relegated to a blind for hours at a time.  I didn’t have to contemplate the long term side effects of having my butt fall asleep.  I didn’t have to take boring selfies and put them on Facebook.  I didn’t read.  Not. One. Word.  That first hunt at the Double B resulted in my first Rio, a gorgeous tom, and I vowed to come back each spring.  Not that Greg really wanted me to but he is just polite that way.

This spring was no different .We logged a whopping 8 miles that first day and I couldn’t have been happier.  Well, except that I had no turkey, but that was only because Greg doesn’t know how to call.  Ok, that’s not true at all but I just wanted to see if you were still with me. He is a turkey calling Super Genius. On the next day of the hunt I had the good fortune to hit the canyons for a beautiful Spanish Goat that Greg unfortunately had to carry out of the canyons.  I didn’t have the heart to tell him that the goat made him stink.  Sorry, Greg.  But you did smell like dead goat.

Our last day of hunting was fantastic.  In the lulls of passing time, I was able to take two javelinas that had the misfortune of ambling past.   We later called in a group of toms that all came through strutting and strumming.  It was singularly the most beautiful sight.  I had never been set up in front of that many turkeys before.  I took a beautiful double bearded tom but not before we had to artfully switch places due to the fact I insisted on NOT sitting where Greg had suggested I sit.  I suppose this is sort of a confession.

On the serious side, I truly enjoy the experiences at Double B.  Greg and all of the guides have great senses of humor, patience and all are willing to teach.  They have to be patient to deal with eight certifiably crazy women at one time.  I’m not saying they enjoy it, but I pretend they do. Additionally, the lodging and food is remarkable!  Linda and Kendra man the kitchen and if you leave there hungry or skinnier than when you left you must have had your jaw wired shut.  We book women’s only spring turkey hunts and fall whitetail hunts  annually and pack the joint each time.  For more information about Double B Outfitters www.doubleb-outfitters.com and for more information about the Prois Women’s Only Hunt contact Kirstie@proishunting.com.