Prois Turkey Tips- Learn 4 Old Fashioned Tips from Jim Casada at NWTF!

A great deal can be said for relying on traditional approaches when dealing with gobblers. Minimalism is the essence of old-fashioned hunting. Hunters walked into the woods with only a few items, a snack, and passion. Nothing techy lined their pockets and despite their gear, what truly defines the traditionalist is not equipment but how he or she hunts.

Here are some key aspects of traditional turkey lore, which deserve to be part of every modern hunter’s approach to the sport.

READ ON!

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#prois #hunting #NWTF #JimCasada #turkeyhunting

Prois Turkey Tips- Learn From the Pros at NWTF…Do Turkeys LEARN??

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Most turkey hunters spend an incredible amount of time and brain matter trying to outsmart their turkey counterparts.  But the big question here is this…do turkeys learn from our mistakes or success?

John Higley of NWTF has the following advice…

An old tom gobbled at the hunter’s every yelp, but instead of sauntering into shotgun range, he stayed just out of sight and eventually drifted away. “Darn,” the hunter thought. “That old boy was toying with me just like he did the other day. That’s one smart turkey!”

Maybe so, and maybe no. Spring after spring, hunters encounter frustrating gobblers; birds that seem ripe for calling but don’t cooperate. Some of them rattle a few times on the roost, fly down and clam up for the rest of the day, leaving hunters to wonder if they did something wrong. It’s even worse when a tom continues to gobble at your pleading yelps but then hangs up and refuses to take another step.

Because they’re fickle, some hunters give turkeys almost Einstein-like qualities when it comes to intelligence.

READ ON!

Prois Turkey Tips! Signs, Signs…Everywhere There’s Signs!

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Sign Language Scouting as Described by Steve Hickhoff from the NWTF

Hunters use the term “sign” to speak of evidence left behind by the quarry they’re hunting.

Tracks – Track size can indicate the sex and age of an autumn and winter flock’s turkeys. Mixed sets of new and old tracks say flocks regularly use the area. Note them on field edges, muddy access roads, and wherever groups favor a food source.

Droppings – Damp droppings say wild turkeys were there recently. Typically we assign j-shaped leavings to gobblers, and bloblike ones to hens, but sometimes that can vary. Dry, decomposing sign says turkeys were once there, but may have moved on, likely to another food source.

Feathers – Concentrated feathers can reveal a roost site when slightly dispersed in likely cover below big-branched trees, or a predator kill when tightly compacted in a single small area. Biology tells us turkeys molt according to age and sex. Poults lose and replace feathers as they grow toward fall. Juvenile turkeys stop molting come winter, then start again in spring. Adult turkeys shed feathers into summer when molting peaks. Breeding gobblers do so after their mating activity passes, and hens molt after broods are hatched, or nesting is unsuccessful.

Scratchings – Raked areas in the woods, along field edges, or in food plots, often indicate autumn and winter turkey feeding zones. These scratchings can show the number of birds in a flock. Tracks, droppings, and feathers may also be found among this feeding sign. Old sign of any kind may indicate turkeys have left the area for other food sources.

Dusting Areas – Early autumn, pre-freeze dusting bowls are fresh if the soil is loose, and other sign in them or nearby is new. Seasonally, wild turkeys around the country dust spring, summer, and fall.

More or Less – Abundant sign indicates bigger flocks, while spare evidence reflects fewer numbers.

— Steve Hickoff
NWTF

http://www.nwtf.org/tips_adventures/tips.php?id=14021?utm_source=home-page&utm_medium=article&utm_campaign=hunt

Gobble. Gobble. BOOM! The success continues for the ladies of Prois!

It was a great weekend of turkey hunting for Prois staff and customers everywhere, take a look at all these trophies!

Host of His & Hers Outdoors TV and Prois staffer, Stacy Sissney, doubled up on gobblers alongside her husband…

Stacy Sissney

Stacy Sissney Gobbler

Prois Customer, Sarah Fromenthal, enjoyed the thrill of her first turkey harvest…

Sarah Fromenthal

Prois customer, Mitzi Weiss, dodged the Texas rattlers to score her bird…

Mitzi Wiess

Prois staffer, Becky Lou Lacock, guided for the Tennessee Governor’s One Shot Turkey Hunt and helped 12 year old, Chloe Webb, take this big thunder chicken weighing in at 22.2 pounds…

Becky Lou Lacock

As always, the Prois Posse makes us proud… Keep up the great work ladies!

Prois Turkey Tips- Need Patterning Tips? Learn from the Pros at NWTF!

7 Tips for Pattern Perfection
Every year, millions of hunters flock to the hardwoods, bottomlands, rolling hills, pine forests and numerous other landscapes in pursuit of the wild turkey. And, every year, some of them walk out of the hunt with a hollow feeling of disgust, because they missed their turkey.

Though there’s nothing these folks can do about the past, they can do something to keep from missing their shot in the future. Being prepared, knowing their firearms, and spending a little time on the shooting range can, and will, remedy shooting problems that have humbled many turkey hunters.

Knowing how your shotgun patterns is only part of the equation to having a successful turkey hunt. But it is a very important part. Practicing the shot before the hunt will leave you confident with your shooting abilities, and you’ll be able to focus on other important parts of the hunt.

Try these helpful hints from NWTF experts to help make sure the next time the opportunity presents itself, you walk out of the woods with a turkey over your shoulder.

LEARN THE NWTF PATTERNING TIPS NOW!

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Decoy Set-Up Tips! See How NWTF Pros Set Up For Pre-Breeding, Peak-Breeding and Post-Breeding!

It’s turkey time and the NWTF never lets us down with great tips from the pros! Not sure when to use the decoys you have? With the help from Montana Decoy Co. we bring you three decoy set-ups, corresponding to the phases of the rut, to help you take down a turkey this spring season.

Learn Pre-Breeding, Peak-Breading and Post-Breeding Decoy set-up methods!
http://www.nwtf.org/tips_adventures/tips.php?id=14259

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Prois Tips! FIELD DRESSING YOUR TURKEY…THE DOWN AND DIRTY!

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Before you begin field dressing your gobbler, you need to make a decision. Do you want the bird to grace your dining room table, or the wall of your den? Either way, proper field care is important for birds that will be served as a main course, as well as for those to be mounted. If you intend on eating the bird, follow these field-dressing instructions to ensure the finest tasting turkey possible. Please consult your taxidermist should you wish to mount your bird.

First, remove the beard by cutting if off close to the point where it attaches to the breast. Take care not to cut the butt or end of the beard as doing so may cause the individual “hairs” to fall out.

Make a small incision at the tip of the breastbone with a sharp knife.
Carefully peel the skin and feathers away from the breast, legs, thighs and back.

Remove the legs at the knee joint by cutting the tendon and bending the joint until it snaps (some additional cutting may be required).

Severing the head at the neck removes both the cape and the head.

Next, remove the entrails by making a small cut in the thin tissue between the vent (anus) and the point of the breastbone. Make sure to remove the lungs (pink, spongy material) located on either side of the backbone high in the chest.

Wipe the cavity clean with paper towel, and remove any feathers that remain on the carcass.
Voila!

ENTER THE NEW PROIS PHOTO CONTEST!!!

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Enter you favorite turkey hunting picture for your chance to win the Spring Prois Staff Pick Item of your choice! Use the hashtag #ProisTurkey in your caption and tell us what sale item you would want if you win then share the link to your timeline. Just visit www.proishunting.com and look for the Spring Prois Staff Pick turkey seal. Contest winner will be announced Friday March 13th. Just click this link to enter http://woobox.com/s2x9bj