Bowfishing Association of America’s (BAA) World Championship

By Prois Staffer Gretchen Steele

Hundreds of bowfishers, and a total of 72 boats descended on Aurora, Kentucky for a record setting Bowfishing Association of America’s (BAA) World Championship tournament, and Prois was there!

A summer spent bowfishing almost daily, participating in other smaller tournaments, culminated in a great weekend in Aurora, Kentucky at “The Worlds” .

Team Back-N-Black at the BAA World Championships

Team Back-N-Black at the BAA World Championships

Said BAA Points/Sanctioning Chairman Amanda Nichols, “Kentucky always has the biggest turnout for the World’s, but this year was the record year so far for turnout for any of the World’s tourneys. This is the biggest World’s to date and we would like to thank everyone for their support and participation in the 2014 BAA World Championship. Without all of the bowfishermen and the supporters we couldn’t have done it. Big thanks to Marshall County for all the support and donations towards this event. ”

 

Teammate Amy Pease checking her bow pre tournament

Teammate Amy Pease checking her bow pre tournament

The BAA’s World championship Tournament brings the best of the best bowfishers from across the country to compete for 14,000 dollars in prize money. The first place winning teams in the Big 20 Division and Numbers Division both went home 3,000 dollars richer and payouts were also made to those in the top five slots.

 

But “The World’s” as it is referred to by bowfishers is much more than just another tournament, and just another purse. It’s a full blown weekend event that gives bowfishers from across the country a weekend together filled with friendship, fellowship and fun. For many it is the one event of the year where all of their bowfishing buddies are in one place.

 

 So thrilled to receive my flopper stopper from "The Shot"

So thrilled to receive my flopper stopper from “The Shot”

As it was close to my birthday, several bowfishing pals brought good luck/ birthday gifts, including a most special gift from bowfishing icon “The Shot” Willett. Shot, as he is known on the tournament circuit and in the bowfishing community, presented me with my own “Wild Woman Flopper Stopper” Receiving a flopper stopper from shot is true sign that one has arrived so to speak in the bowfishing world. My team mate and fellow badass Amy made sure that I had my traditional “ducky” pre tournament good luck present and few things to celebrate our participation in the prestigious worlds. Seriously, doesn’t everyone bowfish in a camo feather boa????

 

Photo Courtesy of Amy Pease

Photo Courtesy of Amy Pease

For the communities that that host the World’s it’s a huge influx to the local economy. “It’s hard dispute what we bring in, when that guy with the truck and airboat walks into to your gas station and slaps 4 hundred dollar bills down just for fuel. “ Said Mark Lee, President of BAA. Lee further pointed out the economic benefits to the community in dollars spent on lodging, meals, and trips to local shops for last minute items. Additionally local civic groups can help fill their organizations coffers by providing food, drinks, etc. at the tournament site.

At this year’s Worlds the Aurora Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary were kept hopping serving up food both before and after the tournament. “We are just thrilled to have the bowfishers in Aurora – we had the Kentucky State Shoot here earlier this year and we loved every minute of it. We couldn’t wait for the Worlds to get here. Our small community is suffering, just like so many, and the bowfishers bring us so much! “Said a representative from the ladies auxiliary.

Weigh in went smoothly by utilizing three stations

Weigh in went smoothly by utilizing three stations

That sentiment was echoed by Tammy Nanney from nearby KenLake State Park Resort where “all those big bowfishing boats” were the talk of the resort guests and staff. Nanney pointed out that bowfishing at Kentucky Lakes is excellent, sporting some of the largest big head carp in the Midwest, and the myriad of available Kentucky Parks lodging options from camping to cottages to resort level are always welcoming to those who plan a bowfishing vacation at Kentucky Lakes.

The tournament was truly a community affair, with many from Kentucky Lakes area coming out to talk with bowfishers, ogle the boats and equipment on display and to watch well-orchestrated take off of 72 boats.

Chatting with one of bowfishing’s young stars, Kenzie Taylor and complimenting her on the way she represents bowfishing and sets such a great example for young women bowfishers.

Chatting with one of bowfishing’s young stars, Kenzie Taylor and complimenting her on the way she represents bowfishing and sets such a great example for young women bowfishers.

Companies and industries affiliated with the bowfishing community also recognize the importance of the World’s as a premier bowfishing event and provided excellent in kind and monetary support. For instance, PowerTran donated a full system as a prize in a side competition sponsored by their company.

This year’s successful BAA World Championship proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that bowfishing has arrived as a legitimate outdoor sport and is no longer considered fringe, redneck, or a bunch of goofballs with bows chasing fish in the dead of night. It requires specialized equipment, specialized skills, and is a great conservation tool for the removal of injurious and invasive species.

Prois was there all weekend!

By Christy Turner

 

wWhat an amazing weekend I had with Becky Lou Lacock two weekends ago at the Priefert Ranch in Mount Pleasant Texas. Our days were relaxing hanging out at the ranch watching Chloe ride the 4 wheeler and watching her ride the mare named Buttercup.

We got to meet the world’s largest horse named Radar who is over 19 hands, he was an amazing sight. We also got to meet world famous Australian, Guy McLean. He is an International Horseman, Entertainer and Poet. In between the laughing and cutting up we got serious in the mornings and evenings to try and get eleven year old Chloe from Tennessee her first Texas Hog. We had some pictures on a game camera, stumbled upon some Hog hair on the trail and had a real close encounter on the ground with them Friday evening.

The Hogs were right there, I could even smell them and Becky Lou almost got ate but I was watching her back. Our time ran out before Chloe could bag her first Hog but we made a lot of good memories and hope to try again someday soon.  Our gracious host was Travis Priefert, the Grandson of Marvin Priefert who was the founder of the family owned and operated Priefert Manufacturing. You need to check out their web site at www.priefert.com and read, about the family. This hardworking family lives the American dream because they refused to give up even when times were tough they said. I admire each and every one ofthem and respect how humble and honest they all are. Also watch for their new reality-based hunting tv show called “The Prieferts” on the Sportsman Channel. The premiere will air July 3rd 9:30C. This is going to be a must see, I can’t wait!

 

Fear not Christy Turner bagged herself a hog last weekend while hunting and fishing with fellow Prois gal Stacy Sissney and family !

 

 

Giving Back

The crazy wrangling team

By Nancy Rodriguez

Opening day of the spring turkey season was very different than my usual turkey hunt.  Instead of sitting patiently waiting for a turkey to strut by, I was in the middle of an amazing elk capture/relocation. My husband, Joe and I were honored to be invited to participate at a Tule Elk capture in central California, by our friend Joe Hobbs.   Joe Hobbs is a senior environmental scientist that works for California Department of Fish and Wildlife. He also happens to be the California elk coordinator.

 

California is home to three subspecies of elk: Roosevelt elk, Rocky Mountain Elk, and the very special Tule Elk. Tule Elk are only found in my home state of California.  The Tule Elk in California were once close to extinction. In the mid 1870’s there were reports that fewer than 30 elk remained in a single herd near Bakersfield, Ca. A cattle rancher named Henry Miller preserved this last group of elk that he discovered on his ranch in 1874. Experts believe the elk were pushed to the brink of extinction from loss of habitat, market hunting, and displacement from cattle. Thanks to Henry Miller and others that followed suit by 1970’s the Tule Elk population had grown to around 500 animals. Over the years with improved management, the help of wildlife organizations and conservation agencies like RMEF, Tule Elk numbers have steadily increased.   Today California has over 4000 Tule Elk in 22 distinct herds!

Sunrise in Tule Elk Country

 

Joe and I arrived on Friday afternoon at the San Luis Wildlife Refuge for our mandatory safety meeting. We met with approximately 70 employees from California Department of Fish and Wildlife and US Fish & Wildlife services, along with veterinarians, andnthe helicopter capture crew. Joe Hobbs conducted the orientation meeting, assigning everyone a specific job. We all broke into groups to become familiar with our upcoming rolls. Joe and I were assigned to the trailer chutes. We rotated with another team manning the chute gates as the elk were herded into the trailers for transport.  6:30 am Saturday morning couldn’t come soon enough. We arrived at base camp full of adrenaline and excitement. The teams quickly dispersed into their designated areas. The teams consisted of: The helicopter crew, the ground transportation teams, the processing teams, the wranglers, and the relocation team. Each group showed amazing team work.

Leading Edge Aviation Team

The first team up was the helicopter crew, Leading Edge Aviation. They are a team of four dedicated wildlife capturers. The pilot’s job is to bring the chopper down over an elk to net gun level. Then one of the gunners hangs out of the chopper, aims the net gun over an elk and fires the net for capture.

Helicopter net gunning an elk

Once the elk is in the net, the chopper drops to a low hover, a team member jumps out and immediately blindfolds and hobbles the elk for transport. The pilot radios the closest ground team for pick up. These guys are fast!  On arrival the ground teams quickly lift the netted elk onto litters. They safely transport the elk on the back of Gators or trailers to the processing station.

Joe doing his job of blindfolding and Nancy posing

The elk are strapped to the litters for safe travel.  The next team is the processing team. There were 5 tents set up to process the elk as quickly as possible. They consisted of Ca. Fish & Wildlife employees, US Fish & Wildlife, and veterinarians to collect samples and data on the elk. First the elk are weighed and then carried to a tent station.

Checking weight

There the team would draw blood, check general health, place ear tags, and radio collars for future research.

Processing team taking blood samples

The entire time the elk’s temperature was monitored closely and cool water and ice packs were applied to maintain the animals temperature if necessary.

Processing team cooling the elk with cold water

Once the research teams finished their jobs, the elk were carried to the corral to be persuaded into the trailers.  The corral is what I called the “elk wrangling station”.   This station consisted of a metal pipe corral about the size of a small garage with two chutes that led into the trailers. The pipe fencing was covered in black burlap, so the elk would stay calm.

The wranglers stand ready in the corral

The ground crew would carry the elk on the litter into the corral. They would safely tip the litter to lay the elk on the ground. The elk wranglers would then remove the hobbles and blindfolds as quickly as possible. Next they would use bucking boards to persuade the elk up the trailer chutes. Joe and I would nudge the elk up the chutes and close the gates behind them as fast as we could, as they entered the trailers.

Nancy ready with a bucking board

On the second day, Joe and I we’re invited into the corral to help with “wrangling”. Joe removed the blindfolds and I helped out with the bucking boards.  The final stage and the most amazing part of the capture was yet to come. Joe and I were able to go to the grand finale… the release! We had two trucks and blacked out trailers full of elk, followed by a safety vehicle.

Ready for the ride to a new home!

After a 2 ½ hours drive, we arrived at the elk’s new home. We pulled into the wildlife area full of hope. As we opened the trailer doors and stepped back, each elk curiously stepped out of the trailer and safely trotted off  into their new home. Watching them run off, I was completely speechless!  We had just been a part of one amazing adventure.

Freedom!

We had helped with the California Tule Elk re-population, conservation, and management process.  All in all, the teams safely captured and relocated 36 Tule Elk to three different locations in California. California is lucky to have Joe Hobbs as the elk coordinator. He ran a safe, seamless, and upbeat elk capture. With people like him, Fish and Wildlife agencies, and conservation groups like RMEF, we can keep supporting our once nearly extinct Tule Elk.

This experience was one we will never forget. Not only did we have a great time comingface to face with Tule Elk, but we met some amazing people!

Deep Thoughts with Kara Jo

By Prois Staffer Kara Jo Lorenz
It’s easy to feel disappointed when things don’t turn out that way we want them to. But when you truly LOVE what you do, you find things turn out the way they need to. Take for instance the last day of duck season. I woke up at 3 A.M.- an hour before my alarm was set to go off. I knew I had to assemble the breakfast burritos I promised my hunting buddies and needed to get on the road by 4:45 to be there on time. At 5:00 I arrived, loaded my waders, gun and blind bag in their truck and hopped in the back seat, coffee in hand.  As we drove to the lake we talked about the usual stuff, and tried to decide where to set up for the morning hunt. The day before, they were out with my husband and didn’t have much luck so we weren’t really sure what to expect.
We put the boat in the water and there was no wind but the air was bitter cold while we cruised across the lake. The water was so calm you could see the reflections of the few stars that peeked through the early morning haze. I wish I had a better camera other than my phone to capture the dark sky over the lake. It was a cold, dark gray/blue color with the crisp black of the shore line cutting through- separating the sky and water. I wish I could describe it better. I tried to snap a picture and hoped that there would be just enough light so I could share this beautiful sight with others.  Unfortunately all I got was a photo of pitch black nothingness. Naturally, to guard myself from looking completely stupid (the one friend saw me take a picture with no flash) I quickly turned the flash on and snapped one of our other friend.
We pulled in to the decided area and the guys put out decoys. Thankfully this was an area with little to no ice so set up wasn’t bad. We still had about 20 minutes till shooting time so we just sat in the boat, ate breakfast burritos, pondered over our spot, decoy set up, and questioned our weather man with his “light and variable wind” forecast when there was no wind whatsoever. While waiting, and sipping more hot coffee,  I couldn’t help but tune in to the sounds of the woods beyond the shoreline.  This is a sound that every hunter is familiar with.  The harmonious sound of Mother Nature waking her children. You can laugh if you want, but that’s what it sounds like to me. All kinds of birds chirping and critters wrestling in the leaves when not much earlier, the silence was almost deafening.
A group of widgeon flew overhead about 5 minutes till first light.  Then another small group of mallards flew.  I was getting pretty excited because it seemed we just might have a good day of hunting after all. Then that was it. We sat for almost an hour with nothing else flying. A single came towards us but changed course due to something he didn’t seem to like with our set up so we made a small change but nothing else came even close enough to look.  Shortly after 9:00 we made the difficult decision to quit. None of us really wanted to-  we all know that we have a 0% chance of getting anything if we aren’t out trying.  However it just seemed that the birds were not flying that day.
Now here is the part where your love of the sport makes a difference. I woke up at 3 A.M. on a Sunday, rode on an aluminum boat across a lake by 5:45 while it was 30 degrees out, waded out in icey cold water, sat in said boat for two hours with two other people, watched birds fly that I couldn’t shoot, and came home with the same amount of shells I went out with and no ducks on the last day of the season. Oh and my breakfast burritos were totally cold. This could be considered a major disappointment. But as we drove back to the boat ramp, the beauty of the day filled me with appreciation of the opportunity to be out with friends. Again, the water was so calm it was like a mirror reflecting the gorgeous blue sky and white clouds. This time, I was able to snap a few pictures. (I say a few but it was really about 20) Had I not made the choice to go out hunting that morning, I wouldn’t have seen how gorgeous this lake was on that day, I wouldn’t have heard the joyous sounds of the woods, nor would I have enjoyed the time spent with friends. I’m thankful for moments like these because I may have come home empty handed, but my heart was full. I couldn’t be disappointed with that.

Hunting…What’s It All About?

Hunting…What’s it All About?

By Kathleen Lynch

            It was brought to mind by an acquaintance in his telling of the 7 point, record book bull elk he had just shot in Idaho, “A special deal” he says…that hunters love to tell stories about the trophies they get, that big is best when it comes to hunting. But where are the stories about those hard sought and not got ones?   How many hunters ever get the opportunity to shoot a trophy, or have had an opportunity and were unable to capitalize on it?   What do we take home fom those hunts?

            This thought process reminded me of a dog-eared page in a book by a great hunter and conservationist, Theodore Roosevelt.  “Plenty of good shots become disgusted if they don’t see a deer early in the morning and go home; still more, if they do not see one in two or three days.  Others will go on hunting, but become careless, stumble and step on dried sticks, and let their eyes fall to the ground.  It is a good test of a man’s resolution to see if, at the end of a long and unsuccessful tramp after deer, he moves just as carefully, and keeps just as sharp a lookout as he did at the beginning.  If he does this, and exercises a little common sense, in still-hunting, as in every thing else, common sense is the most necessary of qualities, he may be sure that his reward will come some day; and when it does come, he feels a gratification that only his fellow sportsmen can understand.”

            I have experienced that overwhelming gratification many times in my 35 years of hunting… it is the epitome of any hunt but on my last buck hunt in Nevada  the tears came not upon my giving thanks to the deer gods for an animal sacrificed but in the truck after leaving the trailhead because the hunt was over.

            The rain was finally coming the last of the sun’s rays breaking through the blackening clouds to spotlight the foothills of the Ruby Mountains, the musty smell of sage, horse sweat and dust permeated my clothes.   I had just spent 14 days in a drop camp next to a pristine, trout infested lake nestled against the steep rocky peaks of the Ruby Crest, 8 miles from any roads.  The hike to the top of the mountain from camp in the early morning darkness was a heart throbbing 26 switchbacks as Himalayan snowcocks whistled their morning tune.  Every day out was a test of physical endurance energized by the will to see more country, more wildlife and a bigger buck!  I had been that hunter, who was looking for something special.  I had passed on several close up shots at forked horns and had taken shots earlier in the hunt at a couple of better bucks and missed.

            On the last day of the season as I was slowly hunting my way back to camp disappointed in myself for having my hopes of bagging a buck again dashed by another missed shot early in the morning I spotted a trophy muley across a canyon at rangefinder distance.. 390 yards.  In a blustery crosswind with no place for a solid gun rest,  I watched as he walked away.  Not willing to give up I crept down  the canyon to get closer to where I last saw him…knowing that he was up against a rock cliff and that there was always a chance that he may come out in the last fading moments of the day.  I waited, shivering in the stinging cold wind for hours my hope fading with each moment of the lowering sun.

            I believe that there is a reason for everything and the reason I missed those other bucks was so that  I would have the opportunity for that big buck encounter.  My reward for the hunt did not terminate in a trophy nor a buck but my reward came from being witness to a part of nature that few have the opportunity to see. That was my reward for this hunt that and the peace, stillness (Tilyoweh), natural beauty and wildlife that I always experience while hunting…and someday when I am able to capitalize on another opportunity for a buck the gratification I will feel will be GREAT, trophy or not!   Another hunting lesson learned, never give up!

            Webster’s defines hunting as simply “the pursuit of game”…the pursuit is what hunting is all about, use common sense, be resolute and someday  that indescribable gratification will be the reward!

Longtime Prois Customer and Friend, Kathleen Lynch!

 

 

Mason’s First Elk

By Shannon Rasmussen

Saturday morning we woke to a fresh blanket of snow and temps in the teens. We gathered all of our warm hunting gear and headed to the mountain. You see, Saturday was a very special day for our family. Our middle son Mason had just turned 12 last week, which is the legal age in Idaho to hunt big game. Mason had drawn a late rifle cow tag, and Saturday was the first day that he could hunt. It was a slow drive as the roads were ice packed, but eventually we made it to the hunt unit. We drove and glassed, glassed and drove. We weren’t seeing many tracks, and after a lot of glassing still weren’t seeing many elk. After a few hours we were about to head home for the day when we cut a set of fresh cow tracks crossing the road. We drove up the road a bit so that we could glass back towards where the tracks were headed. Sure enough there were four cows feeding across the snowy hillside. We decided that we would make a stock on them by coming up and over the hill above them. We drove around the other side of the hill, parked, and started the steep, slick hike to the top of the hill. The snow was crunchy and slippery, and there was a lot of thick brush that we had to make our way through. Eventually we topped out, and very cautiously and as quietly as we could be under the circumstances, started glassing the area where the elk had been. There was no sign of them, so we decided to climb up and side hill to see if we could cut there tracks in the snow and get on them again. As we started to hike all of a sudden my husband Shane whispered “Right there!!”. To our right a cow had jumped up out of the brush and was trotting away. Shane got Mason set up for a shot, and as the cow was about to disappear over the hill and out of sight, Shane blew a cow call. She stopped about 200 yards away. We whispered to Mason to be calm, make sure he was good and steady, and to squeeze the trigger when ready. Boom! We could see the impact of the bullet hit the cow. She swayed and started to slowly tumble forward. Mason shot again and she fell to the ground, sliding down the hill, coming to rest next to a bush. High fives and tears all around! Mason was so excited and Shane and I were so proud! This young man had harvested his first big game animal, and performed like a pro! I cannot think of a better way to have spent a Saturday in December with my family.

Big Box from a Big Box

By Katherine Grand

Kristin loves big boxes

Today was the second time we have received a refrigerator sized but very light box from one of our big box dealers.  When I saw this box I said “I bet it is a couple returned items and a broken fishing rod.”  New employee Kristin Sidelinger was skeptical but sure enough it was!  Apparently a Prois Jacket and a broken fishing rod can easily be confused more than once.  The empty space in the box was filled with empty boxes and packing paper.  The big box employee was far from amused when I sent her an e-mail with the following photos.  Even though the situation is silly, Kristen and I are quite happy to have this epic box in our midst especially since Prois CEO Kirsite Pike is off adventuring in Ireland and we are unsupervised.  Now we have a spaceship, time machine, lion cave, submarine, or anything else our active imaginations can come up with to play with!  Thank you big box store that shall not be named!!

So nice and roomy!

 

ummmm . . . .

The Lioness' Den. Please hold the cougar comments.

A Buck to Rememeber

By Prois Staffer Megan DeHaan

What a crazy few weeks for bow season I’ve had. Probably the most emotional roller coaster I’ve ever been on this year after just getting back into the swing of things after having a baby last year. I’d put in many extra hours glassing, patterning, and hiring babysitters to watch the wee little ones and FINALLY it payed off! I saw this buck 2 times on my camera before season and thought I had him patterned only to be winded the very first day causing all the deer to change everything!  I went straight to town and got that all sorted out with just about every scent eliminating product they had. The next day I went out I saw nothing. The day after that my bow rest came loose and I couldn’t shoot as I drew back on my buck! MAN I was about ready to give up!

I gave it a rest for a few days and then kept going back in only to be disappointed. I thought I’d give it another try and with 20 minutes of shooting light left my buck came in at 35 yards… I shoot! My blood was pumping so fast, I was shaking, I couldn’t believe what just happened. I asked myself if I was dreaming.   It killed me to wait but I waited until 10 minutes after dark and went to find my arrow. Perfect blood! It only takes 5 minutes of tracking and I found him 100 yards from where I shot! I wore my Prois Ultra Hoodie with pride every day and loved how it wicked away sweat as I walked to my stand. On the cold evenings I wore my pullover and it worked perfectly! I LOVE how fitted the arms are so I don’t have to worry about it snagging when shoot. Thank you Prois soo much for making such a great line of camouflage, I will never go into the woods without it!

 

Little Gal Joins the Prois Staff Team!!

Prois Field Staffer Mia Anstine’s daughter Little Gal is so awesome we created a new staff category just for her!  We are proud to announce or new Junior Staff category and the addition of Little Gal to our elite staff team.  Mia and LG are inseparable so we decided we couldn’t have one on staff without the other.   It also was a no brainer since LG was already always decked out in her favorite hunting gear, Prois!

LG spends most of her free time in the outdoors learning life skills and safety through nature and wildlife.   LG is a hunter, shooter, fisherman and all around outdoor enthusiast. She is the star character of the Women’s Outdoor News column, “Mia & the Little Gal” where she picked up the handle LG.

 

LG is passionate about spin fishing, bow-fishing, saltwater fishing and recently has taken up fly fishing. She has been fishing since the age of two and hunting since she was seven. She is a proud member of the junior YHEC (Youth Hunters Education Challenge) team. She competes in hunter education, wildlife identification, orienteering and shooting sports. LG competes with her shotgun, bow, muzzleloader and rifle.  In 2012 she won first place in her division for indoor archery. In 2013 at YHEC regionals she took third place with her muzzleloader and third place in .22.

LG is always thrilled to meet inspiring women in the outdoor and shooting industry. She strives to be a good role model and looks to encourage other girls in the outdoors..

Bucks and Burrs! Great Season for Prois Staffer, Jennifer Morgan~~

By:  Jennifer Morgan

Hey there fellow huntresses!

I harvested this nice mulie buck in NE New Mexico on the morning of Oct 28. I passed on a few (which I have never done before) had a failed stalking attempt and was starting to kick myself for passing on some the first two days.

I am wearing my brand spanking new Gen X pants & pro edition jacket in the badass Mountain Mimicry pattern. The weather was cold in the mornings then warm in the afternoons, but no swampiness was experienced (lol!!!!) The jacket was great to layer with my ultra hoodie. First morning was quite brisk with a breeze and I was quite comfortable. Good wind stopping material. I really love this material as it’s shell is super quite.

The only problem is that every dry grass seed & burr stuck to my pant legs. I’ve tried duct tape, plucking ‘em out (this works but I’m now crosseyed)… Any words of the wise on the best way to remove? Other than that small issue I loved how my new gear performed!!!

***A word from Prois…burrs and seeds do tend to adhere to the brushed fabrics and this is a problem with most fabrics unless you go with a cordura (very loud and hot) or some sleek laminates (again, loud and hot). We too have experienced this and have had some luck with using a credit card/gift card to scrape the burrs. It is a bit faster but not always the perfect answer!***

Looking forward to more hunts!

Prois Staffer Jennifer Morgan

 

To view the entire line of Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women, Visit www.proishunting.com!