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Prois Hunting Apparel Announces 2013 Pro and Field Staff Selections!

Donna Boddington's 2013 Kudu

New to Pro-Staff, Donna Boddington!!
Prois Hunting Apparel
Donna Boddington is a tough hunter. Period. Whether she’s leading the charge up a goat mountain with debilitating blisters or mustering for another scorching hot day of stalking Cape buffalo she is ready with fortitude and an indeed unbeatable spirit.

Born in Braintree Mass, she was raised in a large family before moving to California. Her hunting geography ranges from whitetail on her farm in Kansas to big game in South America, Asia, Europe, Africa, and Australia. On the Dark Continent she’s taken game as small as the dik-dik and as large as the elephant and giraffe. She has harvested both ibex and chamois in Asia and Europe. On her home continent she’s enjoyed hunting all of our big game species and is still on the quest for a mountain goat.
She often enjoys the fun and camaraderie of hi ring alongside her husband, Craig Boddington. She shares Craig’s passion for mountain hunts. Her current short term goal as a hunter is to become proficient as a bow hunter and her long term goal is to succeed at two goats that eluded her in the past; B.C. mountain goat and Pyrenean chamois.

New to Field Staff, Becky Lou Lacock
Becky Lou Lacock is an avid outdoors girl from the word GO! She actively hunts year round including but not limited to deer, turkey, hogs, ducks, birds, and various predators. Sport shooting is often on her agenda including Sporting Clays, and she actively competes in Cowboy Action Shooting noted with her registered S.A.S.S alias “Sassy Bandit”. Having spent most of her life indoors, she is keenly aware that there are many women that do not consider most outdoor sports simply because they do not have 3 very important things; 1.) Information, 2.) Encouragement and 3.) Inspiration. This has helped define her mission in life, which is to provide these 3 things to women using all platforms made available to her. She is an avid volunteer for events and workshops teaching and inspiring women into outdoor activities. With her first TV appearance in early 2010, she has since appeared several times, as guest host, featured hunter, and is currently Co-Host of Double Lung Outdoors TV.

New to Field Staff, Candace Crick!

Candace Crick is a mother of 5 boys, married to her best friend, owner of Tusks-N-Tails Ranch, videographer for Okie Wild TV and now hosting a new show called Vital Obsession. She is a volunteer and guide for Oklahoma Youth Hunting & Shooting Sports program and has started to volunteer her time to helping the local NASP program. She has begun her pursuit towards the North American Grand Slam solely with stick and string. She has been on hunts for Yukon Moose in the vast bush of Alaska; hunted the mountains of Idaho for black bear, and been blessed to witness the migration of Caribou at arms’ length. She takes pride in filming all of her hunts with her husband. Videography to her is just rewarding as harvesting the animal. Candace believes, “We are the vitality to make this dream a reality; we are unconquerable and anything is possible! Sometimes you just need a helping hand and an open heart”. Candace hopes to use the avenues she has been given through the great outdoors to inspire other women and to help them believe they too are unconquerable! Candace is elated to be given the opportunity to take Prois on all of her adventures

New to Field Staff, Joni Kiser

Joni Kiser is co-owner of Full Curl Archery, the largest archery store in Alaska. She was raised in a truly “Alaskan” lifestyle with a father who was a Master Guide and Outfitter that ran a hunting lodge on the Alaska Peninsula for over 40 years. Whether she is teaching private archery lessons, running her youth Home School Archery Classes for the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP), or being an instructor for Alaska Department of Fish and Games Women’s Archery Program – her life truly revolves around archery and hunting and it is something that is deeply embedded in the core of who she is. In 2012 she organized an “all ladies” bear hunt where she took a few new lady hunters out to get their first black bears (successfully!) and says she feels so proud when a woman she has taught how to shoot, goes out and successfully takes an animal with her bow! In 2012 Joni also successfully took a Pope and Young Record Book Brown Bear with her bow and is looking forward to more hunting adventures with her hunting buddies in 2013!!

New to Field Staff, Tad Mecham
Tad has been hunting her whole life. Being outdoors and hunting is not what she does but who she is! Tad is an avid Houndsman, and her passion is hunting with the hounds. Tad and her husband Clint live in Southern Utah on the Paunsagaunt Plateau. They own and operate Sun C Outfitters. Tad is the reigning 2013 Extreme Huntress, has filled 2-once in a lifetime tags, plus-several mountain lion, mule deer and elk tags. She and Rebecca Francis (guide) will be in Alaska in October, hunting for a trophy brown bear. Tad inspects semi’s (DOT COP) for a living, when she’s not in the hills hunting or under a truck, you can find her riding her Harley in Beautiful Southern Utah.

Promoted to Field Staff, Kristen Monroe
Kristen Monroe began her career working for Bast Durbin Advertising selling advertisements for the outdoors industry in 2007. She has always loved being outdoors, and finally put her dreams into action in 2010. After learning how to shoot a handgun at the NRA’s, Women on Target Event. She quickly escalated in the shooting sports — learning how to hunt waterfowl, upland game, deer and turkey. As a mother of two, her children have provided motivation to learn as much as she can about the traditional outdoor sports. She believes hunting and fishing are great ways to stay connected to one’s family. She has found a new level of confidence through shooting and is determined to pass it onto others. Her passion is clearly evident in her writing and presentations. Her latest focus has been concealed carry. Kristen is a freelance writer and currently writes for Outdoor News Publications in an outdoor blog called Pass It On. She is a regular contributor to Women’s Outdoor News and other select publications and websites. She is a member of The Association of Great Lakes Outdoor Writers, National Rifle Association, Ducks Unlimited, Illinois Rifle Association and National Wild Turkey Federation. Stay tuned to here all about our new Event Staffers!

Próis® Hunting & Field Apparel for Women specializes in technical, high-performance hunting and shooting gear for women. In business since 2008, Próis® has established its place as the premier source of gear for the hardcore female hunters and shooters. Female owned and operated- we take pride in not being one of the guys.
For more information about the full Próis® line, contact: Próis® Hunting & Field Apparel, 28001-B US Highway 50, Gunnison, CO 81230. 970-641-3355
Or visit www.proishunting.com

http://proishunting.com/community/index.php Próis® blog- find out what is happening in the world of Próis® and the strange albeit brilliant people who work here.
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Meet New Prois Field Staffer Tad Mecham!

We had to tranq and move a lion that was at a ranch home in the tree. We moved him to a new safe home. Got a tiger by the tail and Prois was there!

Tad has been hunting her whole life, being outdoors and hunting is not what she does, but who she is! Tad is an avid Houndsman, and her passion is hunting with the hounds. Tad and her husband Clint live in Southern Utah on the Paunsagaunt Plateau. They own and operate Sun C Outfitters. Tad is the reigning 2013 Extreme Huntress, has filled 2-once in a lifetime tags, plus-several Mountain Lion, Muley and Elk tags. She and Rebecca Francis (guide) will be in Alaska in October, hunting for a trophy Brown Bear.
Tad inspects semi’s (DOT COP) for a living, when she’s not in the hills hunting or under a truck, you can find her riding her Harley in Beautiful Southern Utah.

NEW Prois Field Staffer Becky Lou Lacock!!


Becky Lou Lacock is an avid outdoors girl from the word GO! But it hasn’t been that long ago her life took a turn from indoors to EXTREME Outdoors! Her shooting and hunting adventures began later in life, and her excitement and enthusiasm just seems to spill out onto everyone around her.

Born and raised in Louisiana, now residing in Texas, Becky Lou is 110% girl and will be the first to tell you that she doesn’t like bugs, critters, or snakes, but her passion for being outdoors is strong and a little dirt, or even or a tick (or two) cannot keep her from all the adventures that lie beyond the Wild Blue Yonder! She actively hunts year round including but not limited to deer, Turkey, Hogs, Ducks, Birds, and always and various predators. Sport shooting is often on her agenda including Sporting Clays, and she actively competes in Cowboy Action Shooting noted with her registered S.A.S.S alias “Sassy Bandit”.

Spending most of her life indoors, she is keenly aware that there are many women that do not consider most outdoor sports simply because they do not have 3 very important things; 1.) Information, 2.) Encouragement and 3.) Inspiration. This has helped define her mission in life, which is to provide these 3 things to women using all platforms made available to her.

Becky Lou in noted in the industry as a contributor to bringing awareness to the women of the world that the door to the Outdoor World is open to each and everyone of them. As a Freelance writer, she contributes stories and product reviews for various online and printed magazines and websites. She organizes women’s hunts across the country, appears for motivational seminars with emphasis on the fact that the door is open, and the Welcome sign is out for women into the Great Outdoors!

She is an avid volunteer for events and workshops teaching and inspiring women into outdoor activities. With her first TV appearance in early 2010, she has since appeared several times, as guest host, featured hunter, and is currently Co-Host of Double Lung Outdoors TV.

Early on she coined and later trademarked the phrase “Camo can be Classy”™, and can often be quoted with her favorite line, “Shooting.. it may be for you, or it may not, but it is definitely worth a Shot!”

2012 Prois Award Finalists~ Meet Michelle Bodenheimer!

It is a moment I will never forget… that moment when I first heard the bugle of a majestic bull elk echo through the forest. I was in my early 20s. Although it was my first big game hunt, I realized it would not be my last. I was captivated by the sights and sounds of those Central Idaho mountains; they had stolen my heart.

I quickly fell in love with hunting and the idea of harvesting my own food. I immersed myself in instructional clinics, read about our local flora and fauna, and studied the hunting greats. It was not long before I knew my way around the woods, and had mastered my shotgun, rifle, and bow.

Over a decade later, I have traveled the globe on many hunting adventures. I cherish the memories my hunts have given me, the cultures I now know, and the people I have met along the way. The experiences from my hunts have helped define me. I am not only a wife and mother, but a dedicated conservationist and community activist. As a huntress, I recognized my vital role in protecting our natural resources. I am an active member of a number of wildlife conservation groups, including the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the National Wild Turkey Federation, and I serve on the board of directors for our local Safari Club International chapter. My hunts abroad have also allowed me the opportunity to serve my fellow man outside the boundaries of North America. In 2009 I was introduced to a wonderful humanitarian relief mission in South Africa which I now diligently support and visit as often as possible. The mission provides much needed aid to orphans and impoverished refugee families.

When I am not hunting for myself, I spend a large portion of my time working to preserve our hunting heritage. I cherish my time volunteering as a shotgunning coach, guide and instructor for several non-profit organizations. There is nothing better than guiding a group of young hunters on their first pheasant hunt, and watching their faces light up when they harvest their first rooster; or leading a new huntress into the forest in pursuit of her first deer.

I do not measure my success as a huntress on the size or quantity of my harvests, but rather on the quality of my memories from the field. This last year my son, Wyatt, became old enough to join me on more challenging hunts. Although I have been blessed with the opportunity to hunt in a number of exotic locations, my most favored hunts have been at home in Oregon with Wyatt. Creating these memories with my son is a much greater trophy than any head I can hang on my wall.

Last fall, however, I feared my outdoor adventures had come to an end. My doctor phoned with questionable results from a biopsy. The next week I was having surgery to remove a mass of breast tissue. My world was crashing down. I questioned whether I would be able to continue to share my passion with Wyatt or others. Although I recovered from my surgery, I was left with permanent nerve damage to my right arm… my shooting arm. Had my last hunt been my last?

I refused to relinquish my passion for the outdoors. I am a huntress and will always be a huntress, and I was not about to let any disability stand in the way. With hard work and determination, I retrained myself on how to position my shotgun and rifle, and how to draw my bow. Within two and a half months, I was back in the field guiding, instructing, and living my dream. I coached Wyatt to his first 3D archery tournament win this past summer, and last month I was again in the forest hunting for myself. I was breathing in the fall colors, the smells, and the sounds. I was where I was suppose to be… in the great outdoors.

Twin Biathletes Racing for Olympic Gold!!

Prois Pro-Staffers and Twin Biathletes Tracy and Lanny Barnes


The Olympic racing season has started! Yep, I know, it seems a bit early seeing as though the Olympics aren’t until February. But the qualifications started last week in Jericho, Vermont. Close to 150 athletes from the U.S., Canada, Sweden, and Lithuania showed up for the event. The weekend consisted of 2 races. A short 7.5 kilometer sprint race with two shooting stages and a 10 kilometer pursuit race with 4 shooting stages. The first race for Tracy and Lanny was anything but good. Poor shooting and timid skiing put the twins in the middle of the pack. The next day, with a bit of fire lit behind their back sides, and a hunger for blood, Lanny and Tracy came out guns a-blazin’ and had the fastest times for the Americans, putting them in a good
spot for the qualifiers. The twins made a huge jump from the day before, shooting great and skiing fast too. The best news that came out of the weekend of racing was that the twin’s legs were feeling better than they have in years. They experienced no symptoms like they did in years past. This put a huge smile on the twins face and made them even more motivated going into the fall training season and leading up to the Olympics this winter. The fall months are going to be packed for Tracy and Lanny as they prepare for the winter and the
next set of qualifying races in Utah in October. The twins will be home only for a week this fall and once October hits, they’ll probably only make it home a couple of days before the end of March. The qualifying races for making the Olympic team started in August and will go through the beginning of January, at which point the Olympic team will be named. And the twins have their shoe laces tied and are ready for the big push. The twins want to send out a big THANK YOU to everyone who is supporting them. You are their motivation. Have a great fall
and let’s go for gold!

Julie Golob is Back in the Saddle Again!

By Julie Golob

I am excited to share that I competed in my first event since having my daughter in April! Last weekend I shot the 2013 USPSA Northern Rockies Sectional in Hamilton, MT. I placed 4th Overall in the Production Division and finished second among the women behind a ladies national champion, Sara Dunivin.

As expected, my guns and gear ran flawlessly. Considering it has been over a year since I last competed in USPSA, I am beyond pleased my performance. Pictured at the top is my match report infographic from the competition with some interesting stats.

In addition to sharing photos and updates throughout the match on social media I also wrote an article for Women’s Outdoor News (http://www.womensoutdoornews.com/2013/08/action-shooting-coverage-2013-uspsa-northern-rockies-sectional/), shared a post on my blog (http://www.juliegolob.com/10-reasons-why-my-first-uspsa-competition-this-year-rocked) and created a video from the footage I was able to capture on You-Tube. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-M-V_VMByys&feature=share&list=PL1136DC7197D0B014)

2012 Prois Award Finalist Spotlight! Meet Candace Crick!

I’m Candace Crick, mom of 5 boys, married to my best friend, hunter, competitive archer, angler, and outdoors enthusiast along with a lengthy compilation of various other titles. 6 years ago, I met my husband, who changed me indefinitely. When I first met him, I thought he was crazy spending so much time in the woods, but eventually I was curious to see what all the hype was about. He was leery of me wondering, and I leery of the hype. After experiencing buck fever for myself, I am transformed for life.

Archery hunting became my biggest endeavor. For 2 years, I spent playing reindeer games with whitetails in the woods, often left frustrated and in tears. I have been busted flinging arrows from rooftops and ladders, practicing the real elevation scenario presented from the old might tree stand. Eventually, I discovered archery competitions, a perfect opportunity to help me flourish as an archer. Much to my surprise, I won gold in my first tournament leading to several other rankings from thereon out. In 2011, I won a 2 week elimination style shoot out. I aspire to become more involved in ASA on a national level, and have started my venture of a Grand Slam with my bow. Archery is my fire, I live it, love it, breath it!

In 2012, I became the first certified 4H archery coach for Lincoln County, since the 1980’s. It is not just about teaching my children, the art and skill of archery; it’s about the younger generations as a whole. I take pride in the journey I have gotten to experience with my children, not just being a mom but a coach and teammate as well. The mere fact, that I can inspire one to pass this on for generations to come is a reward in itself.

I was once told by a man, women belong in their women’s clubs back home not at deer camp. Who was he to deem what club I should join? I am not angry with this man, as he has become my motivation. I found out there all kinds of women’s hunting clubs, and even banquets. For the past 2 years, I have been on the banquet committee, for our local NWTF WITO, Camo & Pearls. I aspire to make this event grow in mass numbers. We are here to support each other; we are the vitality that will make this dream a reality. There are so many of us in today’s society affixed on winning gold for themselves, or bragging about the “booner” on their wall, confined with dark walls of self-greed. It is my goal to be devoted to sharing my love and passion of archery and hunting, even if I have to share all my secrets. I want to set an example in the industry. My motto is practice what you preach, and preach what you practice.

I, like others, have had my fair share of losses, as well as success stories. It’s called hunting for a reason, if we are all rewarded each time we went out then what would be our drive? In 2011, I harvested my first traditional archery harvest, a 250 lb. wild boar. I have camped in the mountains of Idaho, harvesting a cinnamon color phase black bear with my compound. I have camped in the bush of Alaska, being one with nature and the grizzlies, harvesting my first Yukon Moose. I learned the art of fly fishing, by catch and release only, and have had the opportunity to fish the sea for Halibut, the fish with 2 eyes on one side. I have eaten yellow fin tuna hearts for the simple tradition of fisherman’s luck. I have driven to the furthest tip of Northern Quebec, on a DIY Caribou hunt, blessed with opportunity to witness at hands length, the migration. Something I feel the Discovery Channel can’t do justice of its sheer beauty. I am currently active staff for several outdoor companies. I had my first magazine article published in 2012.

All things are possible in life no matter what we may deem unconquerable, whether it’s accomplishing shooting a bow, or the finesse of fly fishing. Sometimes we just need a helping hand and open heart. I hope to be that person to as many as I can possibly touch. By being nominated for the PROIS Award, I hope to be one step closer to my goal of illuminating my raw felt passion and love of the outdoors, one arrow at a time!

Falconry Files, Much Ado about Moulting

By Katherine Grand

Katherine Grand and Aurora during their first season hunting together

Many people ask me questions about what it is falconers and falconry birds do during the summer so I thought I write a little blog with answers to my most frequently asked questions. During the summer most hunting seasons are closed for both falconry and other hunting methods. Furthermore raptors are moulting during this time which means they are losing their feathers from the previous season and growing in new ones. During this time falconry birds need to be kept at a higher weight than their ideal hunting weight for the increase metabolic demand of feather production. Poor diet, disease, or starvation can result in feather deformities. In falconry a raptor’s weight is very important to its performance while hunting and responding to its falconer. Falconers weigh their birds daily while they are hunting them, often times multiple times a day. Also growing feathers are much more susceptible to being damaged, sometimes resulting in permanent damage to a feathers. For these reasons the majority of falconers do not hunt their birds during the moult.

A moulted juvenile tail feather from Aurora

All my previous red-tailed hawks I have trapped in the fall as juveniles, hunted during the winter, then released in the spring. I am keeping Aurora through the moult this summer which is called intermewing. The transition between juvenile feathers and adult feathers in red-tailed hawks is especially dramatic and exciting as typical juveniles have brown tail feathers (AKA train feathers in falconry speak) and most adults have brick red tail feathers which are the red-tails namesake.

This photo shows Aurora's adult brick red train feathers coming in. The brown feathers are her juvenile feathers which have since moulted.

Many people ask me if raptors are still able to fly while moulting. Healthy raptors do not lose all their feathers at once, in the wild they continue to hunt and fly year round. They lose their feathers gradually so they are always able to fly. There are of course exceptions to every rule. Raptors that are unable to fly would die of starvation or predation. To learn more about raptor feathers and moulting visit http://www.themodernapprentice.com/feathers.htm.
So what do falconers do with their birds during the moult? I like to continue to work with my birds handling, training, and flying them throughout the moult. Some falconers just leave their birds alone in their mews (raptor aviary http://www.themodernapprentice.com/mews.htm) while other handle them extensively. I enjoy feeding Aurora from the fist (on my falconry glove AKA gauntlet). As you have probably already guessed falconry has its own extensive vocabulary. I also enjoy flying her outside on a creance. A creance is essentially a leash that you tie your bird to so they can’t fly away.

Creance training flight with Aurora in the back yard mid-moult

It’s used during initial training before you trust the bird not to fly away and in situations like during the molt when the bird’s weight is high and they may not return to the falconer. (http://www.themodernapprentice.com/creance.htm) My favorite creance material is fly line. Furthermore I work with her do indoors doing flights in our garage and jump-ups where the bird flies from a low perch straight up to your fist while holding your hand as high as possible (http://www.themodernapprentice.com/games.htm). When doing multiple repetitions this is great exercise. To learn more about falconry you can visit http://www.themodernapprentice.com/ and http://www.n-a-f-a.com/.

A good view of Aurora's growing adult tail feathers during another creance flight.

Stay tuned for future fun filed Falconry Files from your favorite falconer, Katherine Grand!

From the Windows…to the Walls…Oh Wait… How Prois Becomes the Final Resting Place for Wayward Mounts

By: Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

OK. We have too many windows in our house. Not enough walls.

Let’s face it. We have fabulous views. Amazing sunrises. Gorgeous sunsets. We can gaze out over the ranch and Blue Mesa Reservoir. Yes. We have windows.
Walls? Not so much.

Why is this a problem, you might ask?

We are quite simply out of room. No more room for goat mounts. No more room for Dall sheep mounts. Nope. Don’t even think about another moose…the current moose on the wall will never come down without a divorce decree. And even if it did- I can neither confirm nor deny that it most likely cannot fit out any doors. We still don’t know how we got it inside in the first place. So where would the extra mounts end up? Prois of course.

It dawned on me today that this was becoming problematic while I was cleaning the Prois warehouse (yes…I do this. I am the CEO and I do this. I also clean toilets but that is a story for another day) I was trying to sort through crates and boxes when I kept tripping over some elk mounts conveniently stored here. Yes. Plural. There are two. Sitting on the floor by the bay doors. And trust me, they do not conveniently tuck up close to the wall. Or anything else for that matter.

These suckers have been down here for months now. And let me tell you…they are gorgeous. However, one currently functions as a rack for the broom and shop vac. The other is simply a nuisance and occasionally gores unsuspecting shipping clerks who aren’t on the top of their game. Don’t believe me? Take a peek.

I don’t know how or why they are here, but I am willing to bet this is not how they envisioned their sweet eternity.

Don’t fret. They are not alone. The warehouse and office walls are cluttered with bucks, bulls, geese and mountain lions that found themselves homeless. I have to confess…we even have a bull on the wall that belonged to a friend who just couldn’t take it with him to his new forever home. So I am now in the adoption business. For a limited time, we even had a sheep down here that was perilously close to Bunbun’s cage and resulted in a head-butt each time we fed the rabbit. We had a name for said sheep, but believe it or not we just can’t share that.

I have been working tirelessly to decide what to do with all of these wayward mounts. My 17 year old currently uses the moose at our house for a clothes drying rack. Good idea. But we don’t do laundry down here. So that seems senseless. While functioning as racks for cleaning supplies currently works… it just doesn’t feel majestic. Put them on the wall? Oy…we are out of wall room here too. Toilet paper holders? Eh…this would make a trip to the bathroom a bit perilous and I’m not certain Work Comp covers this.

What’s a girl to do?

Goat Chronicles ~ Kirstie Pike, CEO of Prois Actually Draws a Goat Tag Before She Reaches Medicare Eligibility.

By: Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

It’s no secret…I have had a hankering to hunt goats for years. Many years. When I started applying, I had toddlers. Now I have kids in college. You do the math. With anticipation that rivals that of the birth of the new Royal in Great Britain…I have been waiting to see if I drew my tag.

Not that my goat is more important than William and Kate’s baby. Maybe equal. Maybe.

The conversation went something like this…
(Steve) We should know today if we drew any goat tags. Gonna’ check.
(Me) Cool. However, by the chance I draw said tag I will be too old to go. I think the Division of Wildlife does that on purpose. If the NSA can monitor my every move, I am certain the DOW must be able to calculate my potential increasing age/declining health over time. Once I hit that “golden age”, BAM…I will draw a goat tag when I won’t be physically able to go.(ok…maybe they don’t… this could be a mild tantrum. Sorry, NSA if I have offended you…but you probably knew I was going to write this blog before I started it. I hope you like it!)
(Steve) silence…keyboard clicking… Dude. You drew your tag.
(Me) Wuh? I suppose this means the DOW thinks I’m old and fat.
(Steve) …silence…

Over the past month, Steve has made it quite clear he is tired of my own version of a knock-knock joke…
(Me) Speaking of goats…guess who drew a tag?
(Steve) Um. You?
(Me) Excellent guess! In fact, I DID!
(Steve) Who knew?

OK…so I drew! Finally. After more than a decade of trying, it seems it’s my turn! And so the adventure begins!

The weekend provided great opportunity for some high-peak scouting. Finding ourselves over 12,000 feet gave great opportunity to get a lay of the land…or actually..the precipices. While this is an area with which we are quite familiar, I have to admit…it is WAY more fun to scout for MY goat. After a great day spent scaling the ridges and glassing I am beyond excited to get this hunt underway. I look forward to the physical rigors of this hunt as well as the thrill of the isolation of the high peaks. Stay tuned as we pen the next Goat Chronicles and I will try to keep my exuberance under wraps.

Speaking of goats…guess who drew a tag?