Latest Blog Posts

Prois Staffer Dannielle Moore Shows Us How To Goose Hunt!

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

The ladies of Prois are getting it done! We at Prois take great pride in surrounding ourselves with amazing ladies from all over the world!  We love to share their successes, their stories and their humor!  Without these ladies, Prois would not be what it is today!

Dannielle hails from Canada and knows a thing or two about waterfowl!  She has been part of the Prois staff for over a year now and adds (of course) a fatabulous sense of humor to the group.  She also has the MOST amazing posts about being a mom, a hunter and a wife.  She does it all and she is quite simply a badass.  But don’t take it from me, here is Dannielle’s story in her own words.

“I’d have to say that my passion for hunting came later on in life when my husband and I got our first dog, A Chesapeake Bay Retriever. While I grew up fishing on the shores of Lake Superior, we weren’t on a migration

Prois Staffer Dannielle Moore Shows Us How It Is Done!

Prois Staffer Dannielle Moore Shows Us How It Is Done!

flyway so I never duck hunted and we didn’t hunt big game either. So, we brought Pocket home and decided to give this waterfowling thing a try. I trained her and we ran some hunt tests with her before her first hunting season. As the season rolled around I didn’t want to shoot, but rather only wanted to run the dog, until one evening I was sitting in some stinky reeds with the dog and realized I was missing out! The next day, after getting all my tags my husband ran the dog while I tried my hand at shooting. I didn’t know much about guns then, so I gladly took the old bolt action, clip 20ga Mossburg. I shot 1 mallard drake, attempted to reload and promptly told him we were heading to the city to buy me a shotgun!!”

“From there my love of hunting has snowballed and 10 years later I’d say we’ve come a long way, especially for being self taught and not growing up in this province. I now eat, sleep and breath hunting and everything that it encompasses. We have made some amazing life long friends through hunting. One hunting buddy that we met through a hunting forum is like family now and we have waterfowled with him nearly every Thanksgiving for the past 6/7 years.”

“Our hunting has been a bit different these past few years as we have expanded our family. With a 3.5yr old, 2 yr old and 5mth old, I haven’t gotten out nearly as much as I have in the past, but I still have managed to make it on some hunts for geese, ducks, deer and elk. Our hunting mentality has shifted with our kids now. We are wanting to raise them exposed to hunting and have them join us in the field as soon as we feel they are ready. Our 3.5 yr old and 2 yr old love to count the ducks, touch them and name the species. They both came out and took pictures with my buck last year. They know that we hunt our game, hang it in the garage, put it in the freezer and then eat it. They love eating wild game. With 2 daughters I find myself very aware of the image my girls will grow up seeing of me. I also want my son to see that Mommy can hunt and provide for the family, but I take extra care in making sure my girls will see a strong, confident Mom who can get out there into the wild, hunt successfully, prepare it, cook it and be everything else that I want to be to them. Raising girls has left me with this mantra…Love her, but leave her wild.”

To see what the ladies of Prois wear on THEIR hunting adventures check out www.proishunting.com!

Prois Staffer Margie Nelson Falls In Love With Africa!

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

The ladies of Prois are getting it done! We at Prois take great pride in surrounding ourselves with amazing ladies from all over the world!  We love to share their successes, their stories and their humor!  Without these ladies, Prois would not be what it is today!

Margie Nelson has been on the Prois staff for several years now.  Suffice it to say, Margie has a fire about her that is unrivaled!  She is insanely funny, extremely crass and a perfect fit for this company!  Margie also has a zest for life and has battled fiercely to relish each day on this planet.  But enough from me…you need to hear Margie’s story in her words.

“I’m 4th generation Montana hunter, raised by my grandparents! Grandpa was an NRA marksman and all round mountain man. I raised my son myself as I was raised…he’s a good hunter too! We love to hunt! I am a 4 time cancer survivor (breast, ovarian, esophageal and skin) thankful to be alive and able to live the life I love in the outdoors!”

“Africa was a wonderful experience and my PH bragged about me every night. I was the only woman Hunter in our camp of 10! I literally “tagged” out on day three of 9 days! I’m still in awe of the whole African experience!

Prois Staffer and Montana State Cordinator Margie Nelso

Prois Staffer and Montana State Coordinator Margie Nelson

The people, the landscape and of course…all the magnificent animals! I loved hanging out with the PH’s at the fire and listen to their views on conservation and hunting! An awesome group of men!”

“I’m so honored to be part of Prois and the wonderful women and a few men that are all so supportive of all our endeavors… I am looking forward to more hunts and time spent with this great group and representing Prois in Montana! Best thing I ever did was driving to Bozeman to meet Kirstie Pike and Barbara Baird 7 years ago!”

To see what the ladies of Prois wear for THEIR hunting adventures check out www.proishunting.com!

Hats Off to Prois Staffer and Georgia State Coordinator Jamie Dailey With Her First Archery Buck!

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

The ladies of Prois are getting it done! We at Prois take great pride in surrounding ourselves with amazing ladies from all over the world!  We love to share their successes, their stories and their humor!  Without these ladies, Prois would not be what it is today!

Prois Staffer Jamie Dailey Arrows Her First Buck!

Prois Staffer Jamie Dailey Arrows Her First Buck!

Jamie hustles buns for Prois.  Not only has she been a staffer for over a year, she has accepted the position as Georgia State Coordinator.  While Jamie may have an affinity for dancing in grocery stores and sucking down helium in public, she is an ardent hunter.  Additionally, she is invested in many conservation groups such as QDMA, NRA and Whitetails Unlimited.  Here’s a word from this crazy lady!

“My favorite hunting is whitetail and feral hogs The reason I love hunting is because it allows me to be just me…It is always pushing me to do better and it’s never the same. I have never shot an animal that I didn’t thank them for their life. I also have never shot an animal that I didn’t cry over. I can never pin point the exact emotion because its so many at once.”
To see what the ladies of Prois wear for THEIR hunting adventures, check out www.proishunting.com!

Prois Staffer Cristina McGannon Finishes Her Deer Season With Success

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

The ladies of Prois are getting it done! We at Prois take great pride in surrounding ourselves with amazing ladies from all over the world!  We love to share their successes, their stories and their humor!  Without these ladies, Prois would not be what it is today!

Cristina McGannon is an integral part of the Prois Staff!  She not only has a devious sense of humor, she truly devotes much of her time to mentoring and participating in her regional conservation groups!  Here’s a word from the lovely and talented Ms. McGannon!

Prois Staffer Cristina McGannon Ends Her Hunting Season With Success!

Prois Staffer Cristina McGannon Ends Her Hunting Season With Success!

“In 2011 I picked up a compound bow, learned to shoot, passed my hunter safety course and 6 months later harvested my first animal, a NJ whitetail deer. In the last 5 years I have combined my love of travel with my passion and desire to grow as a hunter by traveling all over the US and Canada. I have hunted caribou, whitetail deer, black bear and wild turkey. Last fall I successfully passed the NJ State Trappers Education course to become a licensed trapper. Aside from things with racks, feathers and fur, I love chasing things with fins too! And love a chance to get out on the water for bass or trout fishing. As if that doesn’t keep me busy enough, I am also a NJ NWTF State Board member and the NWTF Women in the Outdoors NJ State Coordinator and give as much of my time as I can to mentoring and fostering a love for the outdoors of women and children as well as assisting with mentored hunts for Veterans and disabled persons. Through it all… the heat, the sun, the rain, the cold, the snow, swamps, woods, mountains and the tundra Prois has been there every step of the way keeping me comfortable in my pursuit to live life to the fullest.”

To see what the ladies of Prois wear for THEIR hunting adventures check out www.proishunting.com!

Hunting Works for Colorado Proves the Economic Impact of Hunting for Our Communities

 

Prois is a Proud Sponsor of Hunting Works for Colorado

Prois is a Proud Sponsor of Hunting Works for Colorado

Finally, hunting season is here! This is the time of year hunters like myself rise well before dawn, load up our gear and head out the door to enjoy the beautiful Colorado wilderness.

While I am excited for the opportunity and the challenge, I am proud to know that my passion for the outdoors is part of an important state industry. The dollars hunters spend to sleep in small-town hotels, eat at local restaurants, and buy supplies from nearby stores, are an important source of revenue for small and large businesses across the state.

In Colorado, hunters spend millions of dollars every year on hunting and hunting activities. According to statistics from the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, hunter spending has created over 8,400 jobs and provides $292 million annually in salaries and wages in our state.

It is important for people to know the positive effects hunting has on our economy and conservation efforts. That is why I got involved with Hunting Works For Colorado. This is a partnership of over one hundred hotels, resorts, restaurants, gas stations, chambers of commerce, convention and visitors’ bureaus and hunting organizations from across Colorado working to educate hunters and non-hunters alike on the important benefits hunting and the shooting sports have on our economy and conservation efforts.

Every time hunters take to the field and shooters to the range, our state benefits. Simply put, hunting works for Colorado’s economy and Colorado’s wildlife habitat. Whether you’re a hunter or not, we all benefit from the economic impact of hunters. Whether for conservation or supporting our communities, the impact is significant, measurable and real.

Kirstie Pike
Co-Chair, Hunting Works For Colorado
CEO, Prois Hunting and Field Apparel for Women

For more information about Hunting Works for Colorado check out http://huntingworksforco.com/

Prois Staffer Nancy Rodriguez Gets Her Man!

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

The ladies of Prois are getting it done! We at Prois take great pride in surrounding ourselves with amazing ladies from all over the world!  We love to share their successes, their stories and their humor!  Without these ladies, Prois would not be what it is today!

Prois Staffer Nancy Rodriquez Bags Her 2016 Muley!

Prois Staffer Nancy Rodriquez Bags Her 2016 Muley!

Prois Staffer Nancy Rodriquez puts another amazing backcountry adventure is in the books. According to Nancy, “I feel incredibly blessed to have taken this muley after living out of a backpack on the mountain for 5 days with intense winds, snow, and downright freezing temps. So worth it!!”

Nancy Rodriguez lives in California and is the owner of Artifacts and Fossils.  She hunts year round and takes great pride int he hard work she puts forth to her hunting endeavors.  She does indeed have a wicked sense of humor and may be one of the only other ladies to have feet as big as Prois CEO, Kirstie Pike.

To see what the ladies of Prois wear for THEIR hunting adventures, check out www.proishunting.com!

Prois Staffer Emma Sears Gets Her Big Buck Down!

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

We at Prois take great pride in surrounding ourselves with amazing ladies from all over the world!  We love to

Prois Staffer Emma Sears Proves Successful on her Mule Deer Hunt!

Prois Staffer Emma Sears Proves Successful on her Mule Deer Hunt!

share their successes, their stories and their humor!  Without these ladies, Prois would not be what it is today!

Prois Staffer Emma Sears, who is a professional guide in the Northern Territory of Australia recently undertook several North American hunts this fall.  We couldn’t help but post this photo of her 2016 buck!  Here is a recap of Emma’s hunt in her own words!

“After 5 days and 2 unsuccessful stalks on this cunning old buck my luck finally changed. We got to top of a draw where we knew he was hanging pre rut. I pulled up my binos and instantly spotted him with 5 does at 1000 yards. We planned a stalk and got into close range, this was difficult due to all the does that were hanging close by. This time the stalk went to plan, we got into 75 yards and I was able to make the shot with Mike Owens Teapot Creek rifle 6mm/284. I’m absolutely stoked with this beautiful 4×5 Mule Deer buck”

Congratulations, Emma!  The ladies of Prois are getting it done!  See what the ladies of Prois are wearing at www.proishunting.com!

Membership DOES Have It’s Rewards…Check Out the Prois Membership Rewards Program!

Just when you thought Próis® Hunting Apparel had reached an all-time high of awesomeness, they throw their new Membership Rewards Program into the mix. The women’s hunting industry has never seen a deal like this before. Take a closer look at what membership-logoPróis will offer customers with this new and exciting program.

First, you might be asking yourself how one takes advantage of such an offer, and it really is rather simple. Sign up by visiting https://www.proishunting.com/membership/ to fill out an application. Once the application is filled out and submitted to our database, you will receive a Membership Card with your very own membership number on it. This personalized number will be the key to earning dividends and getting discounts.

Speaking of discounts, this program offers members a 20% discount on all online purchases of Próis brand clothing. Simply enter your membership number at checkout and you will be handsomely rewarded for doing so. Items not redeemable are gift cards, clearance items, backpacks, or boots.

The Próis Membership Rewards Program also offers year-end dividends equal to 10% of your total annual purchases. So, the more you buy the more you earn. At the end of each year, Próis will tally your total purchases and a dividend code will be issued for use on future purchases. Dividends apply towards any gear offered on the Próis website.

Find out more by calling the Próis office at (970) 641-3355 or by emailing info@proishunting.com.

Prois was created for women, by women who refuse to settle for downsized men’s gear or upsized children’s gear. Each garment is created with the most technologically advanced fabrics available and a host of advanced features to provide comfort, silence and durability. The company’s out-of-the-box thinking has resulted in amazing designs for serious hunters that have taken the industry by storm and raised the bar for women’s outdoor apparel.

To learn more about the company’s innovative line of serious, high-performance huntwear for real women, contact: Prois Hunting and Field Apparel, 28001-B US Highway 50, Gunnison, CO 81230 · (970) 641-3355
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Dogs Are A Girl’s Best Friend.

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

October marks waterfowl month at Prois. While we speak often about the gear, decoy spreads, firearms and preferred ammunition we all prefer for this season, we felt it was time to pay tribute to our faithful canine companions. The bonds we share with our dogs are deep and unbreakable. They are not only essential to our hunting endeavors, they are our ultimate, loyal companions. Dogs are indeed a girl’s best friend.

And…my dog is indeed this girl’s best friend.

Over the last several years I have really become passionate about bird hunting. All birds. I love the sport of the hunt. I love that I can hunt for short periods of time or an entire day. I love the solitude of heading out img_7591in the early morning hours with my knuckleheaded lab, Thaddeus. I love his excitement when we load up, when we head out and when we get on birds. I love the way we are learning to work as a team. I just love that wacky dog! While there are many philosophies on dog training, we have always believed that our dogs are pets but that they also have a job. We don’t personally believe in outdoor kennels and sending the dogs away to trainers…and that is just opinion as many people view hunting dogs in a completely different light. Whichever philosophy a dog owner believes is the right philosophy for their needs. I have to admit, Thaddeus is spoiled rotten. He has three different beds. He travels with us. He has specific ridiculous routines that we not only humor, but encourage. He is extremely connected to us and I personally believe that (in some sense) this plays into his desire to perform and please us.

Initially bred for upland hunting, Thaddeus took to pheasant and quail hunting very naturally. Even as a pup. My husband spent countless hours training him to become an exceptional dog. He works a pheasant field like no other. He has a great nose and never tires out. Despite being a smaller lab, he will pull down a pheasant in flight. He will move heaven and earth to perform. He’s fun to watch in the field and just continues to get better year after year.

What has been even more fulfilling is getting Thaddeus out on different bird hunting opportunities. While he is bred for upland hunting, we decided to get him into the field on grouse at an early age. The hunting methods for the dog are somewhat different than those of pheasant hunting. With some work, Thaddeus has become quite efficient working the mountainous terrain here in Colorado for grouse. These are some of my favorite hunts. He has a great nose on him and loves to work for birds. It is really exhilarating when the quiet solitude is broken up by the flush of a bird, a clean shot and a good retrieve.

My husband started working with Thaddeus on ducks when he was just under a year old. As mentioned, he is smaller lab and he initially had some difficulty with the size of the birds. Interestingly, he finally took to it and has even been efficient at retrieving Canadian geese. In our region, jump shooting birds isn’t uncommon. While there are birds here, the numbers are nothing like the water rich mid-west. The terrain can lead a duck hunter to beaver ponds, streams and lake channels. This type of hunting took (and sometimes still takes) some special work with Thaddeus. Keeping him close at heel is essential and that can be confusing for a dog that is bred to flush. It has been fun to watch him begin to transform. When I creep, he creeps. If I need to crawl into the lake channels to get in on top of birds, he creeps in right behind me. If we are waiting quietly in the early dawn against a tree or behind fallen logs, he positions himself behind me so he can see but is hidden and warm. I enjoy watching him as much as I enjoy being out there hunting. I enjoy watching him when we first start hearing birds come in on top of us. I enjoy watching him charge into the water after a bird and successfully bring back his quarry.

He next took to ptarmigan hunting very naturally. In Colorado, finding ptarmigan is the difficult part of the hunt. They are located way above treeline so getting to them takes quite a bit of time and effort. Time and img_7552effort that is often wasted if we cannot locate the birds. We typically ride out early on horseback for several hours to hunt. Thaddeus works the ground much like he does with upland birds and if birds are present he will flush them out. There is nothing like that tell-tale sound of a ptarmigan flushed from hiding. They are beautiful birds and the difficulty in hunting them makes the hunt even more enjoyable.

There is no doubt that Thaddeus has enhanced my desire to hunt and learn. I look forward to a solid season of grouse, duck, goose, pheasant and ptarmigan with this guy. It is indeed true, dogs do not merely exist in our lives…they enhance our lives.

It’s waterfowl month at Prois. Share your dog stories and photos with us! Because where would we be without these faithful companions?

Feeling A Bit Sheepish! Old Colorado Ram Down!

 

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

Talk about the hunt of a lifetime.  This was definitely the most difficult hunt either my husband or I have ever experienced.  That said, it was all totally worth it.  Now.

This Colorado Big Horn tag took 14 years for me to draw.  I consider myself lucky to get it that quickly as I know many people who have put in for the draw for many more years than I.  Not to mention, if I had to wait to img_1741Medicare age to pursue this monster, I’d most likely be doing it with a walker and oxygen.

We scouted and prepared all summer for this hunt.  We had located a decent band of rams and had watched them periodically through the summer months.  All were legal and there were definitely some fine rams in the mix.  Until the week before season, that is.  We made one final scouting trip to do a final locate only to note that the band had moved on.  While we knew the animals would move about the varying basins and ridges in the region, we knew we would need to get into camp a day early to do some reconnaissance.

We packed into camp 8 miles on horseback, dropped gear and had a friend take the horses back out as we wouldn’t be able to keep an eye on them if we were on the peaks all day.  Camp was set and we were ready to get to work.

We spent a day and a half hiking and glassing the basins which reach well into the 12,000+ elevations.  Just a note here…there isn’t a single area in the region that is easy to access.  The elevation climbs were only a small img_1706part of the difficulty.  Some of the ridgelines are completely inaccessible without dropping down into dangerous scree fields and cliffs along the basins.  After a day and a half, we were unable to locate any rams.  Due to recent rains, we assumed the rams had timbered up but luckily we were having a stretch of sunny weather. We decided to save the basins that were a farther (and more dangerous) distance for opening day.

Opening day we were climbing the peaks at 4:30 under the light of headlamps.  While I previously thought the climb was tough in the daylight, it was exponentially more difficult with a loaded pack in the dark.  Reaching to peaks at 6:30, we were able to glass the closer basins.  As with previous days, these basins were devoid of any sheep.  We pushed out to the further three basins to glass but again, no rams were visible.

We decided to set out to the further basins which required a descent into steep scree fields taking us down over the cliffs of the basins.  The terrain was very difficult and at this point I decided to stash my pack as the additional weight made balance and maneuvering difficult.  After quite a bit of navigating we were able to round out the basins and climb back to the ridgelines.   We dipped into surrounding basins and glassed without finding anything but a few ewes.  We decided to start heading back toward camp.

Interestingly, while we were traversing the skree fields, we noted a lone ram feeding his way through the basin.  We determined he was a great old ram and we were going to work our way down on top of him.  While I sat the ridge and watched for further movements from him, Steve crossed the second basin to retrieve my pack.  Yeah, I img_1717agree…that is indeed true love!  Well, true love and the fact that he could maneuver the scree fields much faster than me!  The ram hadn’t moved and looked to have bedded down.

We worked our way down the ridgeline about an hour as the footing became difficult and the ridge had a number of hidden drop outs that we had to work our way around.  As we worked our way up the ridge behind the ram I finally got my first close look at him.  He was stunning.  The wind was in our favor and we had luckily worked ourselves into a 110 yard shot.  I was able to level off a shot to take him down. This old monarch was determined to be 14 years old by the biologist.  His lamb tips had completely broomed off.  He was solo and most likely too old to continue to fight the younger rams.  As is, he was 7/8 curl on one side and 3/4 curl on the other.  He was magnificent!

I was exhilarated and exhausted.  And the big work was only to begin!  We worked our way down and around the ridge for about 30 minutes until we came back upon him.  He was indeed magnificent.  While I had seen Big Horns in my life, I had never had the opportunity to lay my hands on one.  I was completely taken aback by the mass of his head and horns as well as the size of his body.  This is about the time I started computing the weight and the pack out.  Ugh.

We clicked off our pictures and set to work on quartering and caping.  No easy task on a steep hillside.  We calculated that our pack back to camp was going to take about 3 hours or more with weight.  And had I mentioned the terrain?  No?  Steve packed the massive head and I packed the straps and a quarter as well as some of the gear.  We opted to ditch the remaining heavy gear with the three remaining quarters we stashed in a nearby tree.  The weather was cool and would be just fine for the meat.  We planned to head back at first light to pick up the remaining meat and gear.

It did indeed take over three hours to pack back to camp.  By this point we were both exhausted from the weighted climbs, tough terrain which required walking on all fours in some stretches and the fact that we were now getting fairly depleted.  There is no doubt we had some very silent stretches.  We made it back to camp in time to stow the meat and head.  And maybe just enough time to take a dip in the stream and eat some dinner before setting out in the morning.  I can tell you one thing for certain, we slept very well that particular night.

After hydrating and wolfing down a solid breakfast we started out for the remaining meat and stowed gear at 5:00 am.  After a three hour trek we located our gear and went to work on deboning the remaining meat.  Packs loaded we flipped around and trekked back to camp.  Time to break camp!

We had arranged for friends to ride in and meet us around noon to bring us horses so we could pack out.  We literally got camp dropped right before they arrived.  We were exceptionally happy to see them as we weren’t img_1767really looking forward to the prospect of hiking out.  We had a celebratory shot of Jack, loaded the horses and headed out for the three hour ride to the trailhead.

We arrived home after dark but we were so happy to sit down with a fatty, salty porkchop and a glass of wine.  Of course, we were asleep very shortly after.  I am so grateful to my amazing husband Steve who will work tirelessly to help me on such hunts.  His skill and knowledge never cease to amaze me.  This was indeed the hunt of a lifetime and the level of difficulty made the success even sweeter!

Now…have I mentioned that Steve has a mountain goat tag we need to go after?  Stay tuned!