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Slow Cooker Tortellini Soup with Elk Sausage

Looking for an easy meal to make during the week? This slow cooker tortellini soup with elk sausage is perfect for the woman on the go. Thanks to Dannielle Moore for this delicious recipe! Check it out below:

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1 pack cheese tortellini 6 cups chicken broth 1 can beer 2 cans diced tomatoes 2 packs cream cheese 1 pack baby spinach 2 tablespoons crushed garlic 2-4 elk or deer Italian sausage Season with chili powder, paprika, crushed peppers Combine ingredients into slow cooker, turn on low, stir a few times and after 4-6 hours enjoy!

 

HUNTER REBECCA FRANCIS HAS A THING OR TWO TO TEACH US ABOUT THE WILD

by Kerry Howley, New York Magazine

Screen Shot 2015-08-04 at 1.34.35 PM PHOTO CREDIT: Mark Shoul

 

In an age of social-media shaming, a single tweet can launch a crusade. But maybe Ricky Gervais should have picked another woman to mess with.

Note: The July 27 issue of New York Magazine, in which this story originally appeared, went to press on Friday July 24, three days before American dentist Walter Palmer was identified as the killer of a lion in Zimbabwe.

Palmer’s case and that of Rebecca Francis are both stories of social media outrage spurred by the killing of an African animal for sport, though the two hunters came to public consciousness for different reasons. While it is not at all unusual for wealthy American men to travel to Africa, hunt big game for big money, and post pictures of their kills, the lion Palmer shot was known to some as a mascot for Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park and star of a widely disseminated video. Additionally, Cecil seems to have been lured off protected land, making Palmer, knowingly or otherwise, not a legal hunter, but a poacher. 

Rebecca Francis drew attention not only because of what she had killed, but for who she was: a woman, subject to the same outrage as several who had come before her, such as Kendall Jones, Melissa Bachman, and Jen Cordaro. There was never any question about the legality of Francis’s hunts. Trophy hunters have a bad habit of conflating the legal and the moral (“I hunt. It’s legal. Get over it,” read T-shirts American college student Kendall Jones printed up after she was criticized for killing an African lion.) But there are important distinctions between legal hunting—which exists within a system of regulatory control, wherein permits can be meted out or held back according to the rise and fall populations, and wherein the financial interests of game ranchers is tied to the furtherance of the species—and poaching. Poachers are free riders and indisputably a threat to the long-term survival of large mammals in Africa. That Francis herself has shot a lion under legal sanction does not morally justify the kill, but it does position her within a system of trade that depends, for its own survival, on the conservation of big game. The story of legal trophy hunting involves the comeback of various species in South Africa, the conservation of rare and expensive-to-maintain animals under attack from poachers, mutant animals designed for the evolving tastes of American and European hunters, and the development of the legal market that led to Cecil’s illegal death. It is a story more complex, and ultimately uncomfortable, than the simple savagery of poaching.

Asked about her opinion of Palmer, Rebecca Francis had this to say: “A true hunter will always abide by the laws of the lands, along with the moral laws that are instilled within. Hunters believe in ethical and fair-chase hunting. We unequivocally do not support poaching or any other illegal acts.” —K.H.

CONTINUE READING

 

 

WHO’S READY FOR SEPTEMBER TEAL?

For some, teal season is right around the corner! Who’s excited to get back out on the water and shoot some birds? tealseason

Rebecca Francis Bags a Hippo with Rafiki Safaris!

Rafiki Safaris shared the awesome story on Rebecca Francis hippo, “Okay THIS woman is pretty bad-ass!!! Hunted this amazing OLD beast with a 500NE at 20 yards after a very good stalk. Not many woman can testify to doing that. She made an amazing shot and the hippo dashed into the water and disappeared. We waited two and a half hours for the hippo to fill with gas and then it suddenly popped up right in front of our eyes. The villagers came with their makorro (canoe) to help us retrieve the hippo out of the water. The air was filled with joy and laughter as they were cutting up the hippo and knowing that they would not have to worry about meat for the next couple of months. Congratulations to a very good friend of mine, Rebecca. You truly are a remarkable huntress!

Congrats, Rebecca! RebeccaFrancisHippo

 

WHAT SPARKED YOUR LOVE FOR ARCHERY?

Prois staffer, Andrea Haas, lists her reasons for hunting with a bow rather than a rifle. Why do you bow hunt?

AndreaHaasBowHunting

“Just a few reasons why I love bowhunting!

1) Extends your hunting season.
2) More opportunities to provide meat for yourself & your family.
3) Fewer people bow hunt than rifle hunt, meaning less hunters in the field during bow season & less hunting pressure on the animals.
4) You’ll build confidence in yourself as you learn how much you’re capable of.
5) You will learn more about the animals you hunt & their habitat, making you an overall better hunter & conservationist” -Andrea Haas

Be sure and let us know what sparked your love for archery!