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After many stalks on Sheep in Hawaii last week; I just wasn’t getting close enough. Shortly before my hunt I had dislocated my shoulder and also had a partial tear of my Rotator Cuff. I skipped the surgery option and opted for a steroid injection which took the pain level down and made it so I could shoot my bow. Even so, I had to drop the draw weight way lower than usual. I’m short, with a 25 inch draw and now with my low poundage – I felt that my “ethical” shooting range was 40 yards. We closed the gap on sheep multiple times. Did some really fun stalks belly crawling 60 yards in one instance, or crawling on our hands and knees (this is quite painful on lava rocks) and got 80, 70 and finally 57 yards on the last one. The fog and rain was coming in rapidly and heavy. We knew we only had about 5 minutes to make a decision. There was no cover for me to get behind between me and a very nice ram. He had several females around him and they were skittish. It broke my heart to tell the guide that it was just too far. If I was shooting 70# then of course, If I was even shooting 60# it would have been fine. But I was turned down to 42# and at 57 yards, I knew that it just didn’t have the Kinetic Energy to punch though that thick wool and it would have been slow enough that there would be too much reaction time for him or the females around him to move or spook from my shot. If I wounded him and he ran into the fog which was now very close – we’d lose him. Ethical bow hunting is super important to me. So I said no. The guide looked really, really bummed. He kept saying, “but its a such a nice ram”. LOL. Here’s the shocking part! Most people start off big game huJoniSHeepnting with a gun and then eventually move to a bow. Not me, I started many years ago with a bow and never looked back. Ive taken all kinds of game with my bow, but never, not one single animal, ever with a rifle! The guide had a 30.06 and I whispered; “Ill take it with that gun”. He looked so shocked!! Now mind you, I hadn’t shot a rifle in over 20 years; so I was nervous! I laid down, he said breathe in, breathe out and slow squeeze the trigger. One shot and he dropped. The guide was ecstatic and so was I! I could hardly believe I took my first animal with a rifle! He kept saying, I can’t believe you dropped him in one shot! The fog came in fast and you can see in the background of the photo – there was a mountain there – but all you see is fog. By the time we started to clean it – the fog and rain were upon us. I finished out the hunt week taking a goat, turkey, pheasant and hog with my bow. Will I make gun hunting a part of my plans? Not sure about that because I’m quite addicted to bow hunting – but it was a really cool experience and I’m proud of how hard we worked for this absolutely incredible Sheep! 

-Joni Kiser

From the Ladies Room…A Word from The CEO— The SHARE Act of 2015 Passed By The House of Representatives Last Week…What Does This Mean for Sportsmen?

Prois Badge Full Color SMALLByline:  Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

How often do we really get to receive some good news from Capitol Hill?  Well, brace yourself because we JUST did!

H.R. 2406, also known as the SHARE (Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement) Act of 2015 was passed by the House of Representatives on February 26, 2016.  This bill was introduced in May of 2015 and is essentially a compilation of several bills.  The aim of the SHARE Act is to revise a number of our existing programs to expand access to and opportunities for hunting, fishing and recreational shooting.  Sportsmen and women have been watching this progress closely.  While it is a victory for the hunting/fishing/shooting communities, the bill will now move on to the Senate.

So…what exactly IS in the SHARE Act that is beneficial to our outdoor community?  Here are the Cliff Notes…to view the bill in its entirety, you can view it online at

The bill makes the lead ammunition exemption from the EPA regulation under the Toxic Substances Control Act a permanent. This includes shot shells, cartridges and components of shot shells and cartridges.  Lead poisoning among non-target animals had been traced to lead shotgun shells and lead was subsequently banned to protect migratory waterfowl and other birds from lead toxicity. The bill also prevents the Department of Interior and the Department of Agriculture from regulating the use of ammunition and fishing tackle based on lead content.



The bill amends the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act to increase the proportion of funding that states may use for acquiring land for public target ranges.  Additionally,  it encourages federal land management agencies (U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management) to cooperate with state and local governments to maintain recreational shooting ranges.

Congress found the use of firearms and archery equipment for target practice on federal land is allowed.  In recent years, portions of the Federal land have been closed to target practice for many reasons.  This bill allows for construction of public shooting ranges on lands managed by the USFS and BLM.



The bill establishes that the Secretary of the Interior shall authorize import permits of 41 polar bears legally harvested from approved populations in Canada before the polar bear was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Polar Bears were listed in May of 2008. In other words, a permit may be issued for the importation of any polar bear part from a polar bear taken in Canada to any person who submits a permit application with proof that the polar bear was legally harvested before May 2008.



The bill authorizes the lawful possession of firearms pursuant to STATE law on lands managed by the Army Corps of Engineers as part of a water resource development project, so long as the individual is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing the firearm and the possession of the firearm is in compliance with the law of the STATE. This simply means the Secretary of the Army can enforce any  regulation that prohibits an individual from possessing a firearm at a water resources development project provided the individual is carrying a firearm in accordance with state law.



The bill establishes the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Advisory Committee to advise the Secretary of Interior and Secretary of Agriculture on wildlife and habitat conservation, hunting and recreational shooting.  It also requires the submission of an annual report to the aforementioned secretaries as well as relevant Congressional Committees.  This is a great bill for the hunting/shooting community.

Duties of the WHHCCAC will include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Facilitate the expansion and enhancement of hunting opportunites
  • Facilitate the management of game species and their habitat.
  • Create polices or programs to conserve  and restore wetlands, agricultural lands, grasslands, forest and rangeland habitats.
  • Create policies or programs to promote opportunities and access to hunting and shooting sports on federal lands.
  • Create policies or programs to recruit and retain new hunters and shooters
  • Create programs  to increase public awareness of wildlife conservation and the social and economic benefits of recreational hunting and shooting.
  • Create policies or programs to promote cooperation among the hunting/shooting community, wildlife conservation groups and states, tribes and Federal Government.



The bill requires federal public land management officials to facilitate hunting, fishing and recreational shooting on federal lands. This not only creates more access, but it is seen as an economic gain for the individual states.



The bill revises standards for determining what a baited area is for purposes of the prohibition on taking migratory game birds.  It is unlawful to take any migratory game bird by baiting or on or over any baited area if the person knows or SHOULD reasonably know the area is baited.



The bill prevents the National Park Service from prohibiting individuals from transporting bows and crossbows through NPS lands provided the crossbow is not cocked and all arrows are secured in a quiver.



The bill reauthorizes the Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act to extend the authority provided to the BLM to sell federal land for ranching, community development and other projects.  The bill also allows federal agencies to use funds in the federal land disposal account for deferred maintenance activities or the acquisition of lands that my help address deferred maintenance activities.



The bill authorizes the possession, sale, delivery, receipt, shipment or transportation of African elephant ivory that has been LAWFULLY imported or crafted in the United States.  It also authorizes the importation of a sport-hunted African elephant trophy if certain requirements are met.


And there you have it…in a nutshell.  Having this bill pass through the House of Representatives was a great win for the hunting/shooting community.  We will be watching the progress through the Senate and will keep you posted!  What can you do?  Reach out to your state senators to show support!

Peace out.


Kirstie Pike- CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

From the Ladies Room…an update from the CEO! Prois Embarks On A New Show Circuit Journey!

smallShow season.  It is indeed a gauntlet…and a gauntlet not for the faint of heart.  We have been on the show circuit since December and are pleased to have a bit of down time.

Despite our efforts to inform our customers, the media and the industry of our revised show schedule, I felt it was important to put forth a more personal statement.  Doesn’t that feel all warm and fuzzy?  Doesn’t it??

While Prois has attended the large trade shows, namely ATA and SHOT Show for the past eight years, we felt that 2016 was the perfect time to readjust our show efforts. We opted out of ATA and SHOT in favor of consumer shows such as Dallas Safari Club, Wild Sheep Show, Safari Club International and the Western Hunting and Conservation Expo.

The first conclusion people consider is that Prois is not a viable company.  Actually, nothing could be further from the truth.  We have simply opted to take our dog and pony show directly to you, our customer.  We pride ourselves on having a personal touch with our customer base and we take customer service very seriously.  We have found that our exposure, marketing and sales expand dramatically when we put our efforts to consumer based shows rather than the trade shows.  We get to meet our customers face to face and we take it as a personal challenge to outfit any woman in the Prois system that best fits their hunting needs, physical needs and pocketbook.  Our only regret is that we did not do this sooner!

In this process, we not only create customers…we create fans and friends.  It is no secret that the Prois Staff does not, well, necessarily fit the corporate mold. (Interestingly, we have been told we cannot run a business as we do…I beg to differ) We take great pride in growing the sisterhood of female hunters. We do this through offering the highest performance gear for women on the market, creating a personal experience and by being “real” people.  I personally take great pride in the amazing women that surround the company, who have named themselves the “Prois Posse”.  I aspire to be like each and every one of these wacky women!

So with that, please rest assured that Prois is not only alive and well, we are better than ever.  We still have a couple of shows in the queue, so you will see us in Anchorage at the Great Alaska Sports Show and in Louisville at the NRA National Convention.  We look forward to seeing you all there and rest assured…shenanigans shall ensue.  For if we are not shenaniganating, we are bored.  And when we are bored someone gets arrested.  Or escorted out of a casino.  Alas…those are stories for another time.

Carpe Diem, my friends!!

Kirstie Pike- CEO and Founder
Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women


From the Ladies Room- Talking Turkey In Texas…Say That 3 Times Fast.

Prois CEO Kirstie Pike with Greg Badgett of Double B Outfitters.  Greg is pretending to have fun...but he is not.

Prois CEO Kirstie Pike with Greg Badgett of Double B Outfitters. Greg is pretending to have fun…but he is not.

By: Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

Hunting Rios in Texas.  Who doesn’t want to do that?
Yeah, that’s what I thought…

I look forward to hunting Rios each spring with my friend and outfitter, Greg Badgett of Double B Outfitters near Ozona, Texas.  I’m not so sure he considers me a friend, but he’s not here as I write this so he can’t complain.  Sue me, Greg.

You might be asking yourself what makes hunting at the Double B so extraordinary.  You might not.  You may be asking yourself what you will make for dinner.  You might be asking yourself where you put your keys.  You might be asking yourself why anyone voted for Obama.  You might not.  But given the fact that you are still reading, I am assuming you are hanging on my every word.  Thank you.

The first time I hunted with Greg at the Double B I had only hunted turkeys a handful of times.  While I view sitting quietly for any amount of time longer than 10 minutes akin to being water boarded I do love hunting turkeys.  I had mentally prepared myself for my ritualistic turkey hunting maneuvers which include but are not limited to the following; mouth breathing, head bobbing, finding new ways to rejuvenate the blood flow to my lower extremities without any visible sign of movement and creative face paint application.  I charged my iPhone, packed a book and prepared to face the agonizing task of sitting quietly.  AKA- water boarding.

I was completely surprised when we spent the entire day on foot in hot pursuit.  We put on miles and got into turkeys left and right.  I was not relegated to a blind for hours at a time.  I didn’t have to contemplate the long term side effects of having my butt fall asleep.  I didn’t have to take boring selfies and put them on Facebook.  I didn’t read.  Not. One. Word.  That first hunt at the Double B resulted in my first Rio, a gorgeous tom, and I vowed to come back each spring.  Not that Greg really wanted me to but he is just polite that way.

This spring was no different .We logged a whopping 8 miles that first day and I couldn’t have been happier.  Well, except that I had no turkey, but that was only because Greg doesn’t know how to call.  Ok, that’s not true at all but I just wanted to see if you were still with me. He is a turkey calling Super Genius. On the next day of the hunt I had the good fortune to hit the canyons for a beautiful Spanish Goat that Greg unfortunately had to carry out of the canyons.  I didn’t have the heart to tell him that the goat made him stink.  Sorry, Greg.  But you did smell like dead goat.

Our last day of hunting was fantastic.  In the lulls of passing time, I was able to take two javelinas that had the misfortune of ambling past.   We later called in a group of toms that all came through strutting and strumming.  It was singularly the most beautiful sight.  I had never been set up in front of that many turkeys before.  I took a beautiful double bearded tom but not before we had to artfully switch places due to the fact I insisted on NOT sitting where Greg had suggested I sit.  I suppose this is sort of a confession.

On the serious side, I truly enjoy the experiences at Double B.  Greg and all of the guides have great senses of humor, patience and all are willing to teach.  They have to be patient to deal with eight certifiably crazy women at one time.  I’m not saying they enjoy it, but I pretend they do. Additionally, the lodging and food is remarkable!  Linda and Kendra man the kitchen and if you leave there hungry or skinnier than when you left you must have had your jaw wired shut.  We book women’s only spring turkey hunts and fall whitetail hunts  annually and pack the joint each time.  For more information about Double B Outfitters and for more information about the Prois Women’s Only Hunt contact


From the Prois Ladies Room~ 4 Great Tips for Running & Gunning Turkeys

By: Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women


Great Turkey Tips for Fidgeters!

I confess.  I cannot sit still.  Not at all.  Even if I AM sitting still, I am not.  In fact, I had one turkey guide nickname me, “Fidgets”.

This does in fact pose a problem when it comes to turkey hunting.  I. Just. Can’t. Sit. Still.

Having spent a good amount of time pursuing turkeys this spring, it has become sport for me to keep on the run.  While this technique of run and gun flies in the face of most methods of turkey hunting, it has become one of my favorite endeavors!

Ok, I confess.  I can sit quietly early in the morning.  Even if I have had 3 cups of coffee.  I may be twitchy, but I can sit and wait for the gobblers to come down from their roost, round up their hens and get on the move.  I can sit and call and be patient.  I can sit and assess the movements of the birds.

Until they move away from me.  Then it’s on like Donkey Kong.

All joking aside, this method of hunting can indeed be successful.  With a bit of planning and a willingness to take a chance, you can indeed spot and stalk that bird.

  1. Understand the typical movements of the birds you are hunting:  If you are familiar with their roosting patterns, you should also have an idea as to which directions they tend to move. Don’t be afraid to spend a few mornings and evenings just observing.  Once the birds are on the move, it is often easy to plan a quick route to cut them off.
  2. Have a good understanding of the land and cover:  Be aware as to where the water sources are.  Know where the brush breaks are and where your best routes are located.  This enables you to get into a new location quickly, efficiently and quietly.  Nothing is more frustrating than being on the move only to be stopped by impassible obstacles. Spend time scouting the areas before the season. Once you know the best routes, it becomes quite easy to run and gun once the birds are on the move.
  3. Do not over pack.  I am perpetually amazed when I see turkey hunters laden down with huge packs and vests.  While taking a bit of water is a necessity, taking 3 litres for a 4 hour morning hunt is a bit more than necessary.  While it is entirely unconventional, I suggest not wearing a pack.  At all.  I have found that carrying my calls in my pockets and lumbar compartments is most efficient.  I am a minimalist- I carry my calls, my phone, my license and very compact flashlight.  All of this fits in my pockets.  I carry my shotgun shells in my cargo pockets and I am off.  A huge bulky pack or vest is noisy and a hindrance to any sort of quick movements.  Just try running with a turkey vest.  You’ll see what I mean.  Now, when it comes to decoys, I prefer to take one hen decoy that is very sleek and portable and can be carried while on the run.
  4. Be willing to take a chance:   Why not?  So you’ve sat and the birds just aren’t coming in despite all of your efforts.  Now, moving in or around on birds is not without potential risks.  Turkeys can be educated quite easily and moving about recklessly through their grounds can cause them to re-pattern.  The key is to know the best routes to move behind or around the birds without being detected.


While this method of turkey hunting is not at all for everyone, I have found it to be fun, entertaining and quite challenging.  It works with my caffeine fueled inability to remain still.


From the Prois Ladies Room- Keeping College Age Kids in the Field

By:  Kirstie Pike
CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

As all of us who have hunting families know, getting your kids hooked on hunting early is the key to a life- long passion.  How many hunting seasons have we all encountered where the kids are the first ones popping out of bed, chattering in the truck and getting amped up on typically ‘outlawed’ snacks?

As our kids grow older, life starts to get in the way of the previously sacred hunting seasons.  High school sports no longer recognize that missing school to go hunting is not really considered a family emergency.  And why is it that Homecoming is ALWAYS during hunting season.  Scholastics?  Sheesh, apparently the National Honor Society does not view “a brief illness resulting it missing a few days of school” during hunting season as reasonable.  What’s a kid to do?  At the end of the day, as kids get older, the hunting seasons get shorter to accommodate the demands of high school life.

Then comes college.  Now the debate starts.  Do we put the girls in for tags or points?  Can they get time off to come hunting?  Do we burn points in hopes that they can make it home for a couple of days?  Will they be able to continue hunting as their lives pick up steam and propel them in different  directions?

This year, we debated heavily over what to do with both of our daughters with regards to putting in for licenses.  Both were attending college in state, but not close enough to make a trip home easy.  Our oldest daughter was tied down with school and two jobs and we knew it would be unlikely that she could get enough time off to hunt.  We gambled on our youngest and put in for her buck tag.

As the season drew closer, she was able to make a brief trip home to help scout for muleys.  Keeping in mind that school is located four hours away.  The distance of the trip, coupled with the scholastic demands of her engineering program made it clear to all of us that it was going to be difficult to do much scouting.

The week before the season opened, it became clear that not only was she not going to be able to make it home on opening weekend due to a heavy school load. She wasn’t going to be able to come home until late on Thursday night on the closing weekend.  This quite literally left about two days of hunting.  We were all feeling a bit disheartened at this but decided to make it happen.  Did we make a mistake by trying to push the season?  Should we have elected not to burn her points?  The real issue brewing in our minds was centered around the fact that we knew our  family hunting adventures were most likely changed forever.

We hit it early on Friday morning on closing weekend.  We spotted a number of bucks but none of which were what she was after.  At the close of the day, she passed on three decent bucks.  She was happy with her choices and really wanted to hold out for a larger buck.  We headed home and knew that she only had one day left to hunt as she had to head back to school on Sunday.

We hit it early again on Saturday.  The bucks were definitely moving, and again, we encountered a number of nice bucks.  However, none of them were what Haydyn had in mind.  Unspoken to her, her father and I were worried she would come up short for the season and we were hoping beyond hope that we could encounter the buck she wanted.  We knew this would be extremely unlikely, and Haydyn was fine with that.  It just takes time, and time was the one thing we did not have this year.

As the morning drew on, she passed on two bucks that would have made most hunters quite happy.  Then it happened.  A nice 170+ inch buck worked his way into a clearing about 350 yards away.  This was the one!  Well, we thought.  She sat back and considered this buck for a while trying to decide if he was the one for her.  This really did feel like dog years between the time she saw this buck to the time she decided to pursue him.  She made the move and he drew a bit closer.  She leveled off her shot at 285 yards and dropped him immediately.  We were thrilled!

She got her buck.  To her credit, she never settled on anything less than what she wanted, even though she knew her time was limited and the potential for success was unlikely.  She was thrilled.  And we were proud.  Not because she was able to get her buck, but because she had grown into a mature hunter who realized she didn’t want to feel pressured to take an animal she didn’t want because she felt pressed for time.

By the way…that buck turned out to be a 178” buck.

We got home that night and took care of her buck.  She packed up and left early in the morning.  We have no idea what the next few hunting seasons will bring with our kids.  What we do know is this, these kids will be hunters for life.


Haydyn and Steve Pike. Photo Courtesy of Prois Hunting & Field Apparel

Ain’t too Proud to Beg

By Nancy Rodriguez


The first day of spring turkey season is always magical. As I climb under the low tree branches in the dark, I know today will be a great day in the field. I am hunting after all! My decoys are set 20 yards out, ready for some action. I take my stand in the twilight. I quietly adjust myself in the tall, damp grass and slowly place twigs and branches around me for extra concealment. I lean against a mighty oak tree with my backpack next to me and shotgun across my lap. I have my arsenal of turkey calls ready to start their love songs.


As the curtain of darkness starts to rise, I am greeted with the beauty of spring. The new leaves on the trees are fluorescent green and dew sparkles across the blades of grass all around. Birds are singing back and forth, as a butterfly feeds on a lupine flower at my feet. Suspended from “my” oak tree hangs a shiny thread with an oak worm attached to it. It is gently swinging in the morning breeze. Is there anything better than this?


I start with the first song on my playlist…”Love Me Tender.” My slate call sounds great. I hope a gobbler recognizes this song and gobbles. Hmmm…Nothin! Again…Nothin!!! OK, I change the song. Mouth call in for the next song…”I’m Too Sexy”… Nothin!!!

I switch between these two songs for a couple of hours and no action. Damn Birds!!!


As I quiet back down, my right bum cheek starts to go numb. My nose is running to who knows where, and I have a flock of not turkeys around me, but mosquitoes! Only my eyes are showing a small amount of flesh and of course a mosquito finds it. As I realize I’m getting nailed right on my eyebrow, my left bum cheek goes numb. I have an oak worm inching across my knee, and a spider crawling across the rim of my hat. I slowly flick off my buddies just as a gnat flies right into my eyeball. Direct hit! I rub most of him out except for what feels like his left wing. Serves him right! Where’s my turkey? Damn birds!!


Okay, time to bust out my go to song. I use this only when all else fails.  As I break out my box call, I am really ready for some action! I shift on my now completely numb bum and try not to think about my itchy eyebrow. I sniff my runaway bogey nose, blink my eye with a floating gnat appendage in it, and notice there are oak worms dropping down on me like paratroopers! Time to get this show on the road!


Next song up…”Ain’t too Proud to Beg.” As I hit the chorus-GOBBLE, GOBBLE, GOBBLE! Yeah baby!! I turn up the sound and hit it again…“I AIN”T TOO PROUD TO BEG”. GOBBLE, GOBBLE, GOBBLE!   This time he’s closer. I aim my barrel in the direction of the gobble and with my adrenaline pumping, I wait. I watch the tall grass for any sign of movement, and pray I will see a glowing red head appear. He moves closer and closer, gobbling as he tries to find the hen singing a song no mother would approve of. I line up my fluorescent orange bead on the beautiful red head that magically appears and pull the trigger. Poor thing, he didn’t stand a chance.

A Prois chick playing “Ain’t too Proud to Beg” gets them every time!!!

NEW Prois Field Staffer Becky Lou Lacock!!

Becky Lou Lacock is an avid outdoors girl from the word GO! But it hasn’t been that long ago her life took a turn from indoors to EXTREME Outdoors! Her shooting and hunting adventures began later in life, and her excitement and enthusiasm just seems to spill out onto everyone around her.

Born and raised in Louisiana, now residing in Texas, Becky Lou is 110% girl and will be the first to tell you that she doesn’t like bugs, critters, or snakes, but her passion for being outdoors is strong and a little dirt, or even or a tick (or two) cannot keep her from all the adventures that lie beyond the Wild Blue Yonder! She actively hunts year round including but not limited to deer, Turkey, Hogs, Ducks, Birds, and always and various predators. Sport shooting is often on her agenda including Sporting Clays, and she actively competes in Cowboy Action Shooting noted with her registered S.A.S.S alias “Sassy Bandit”.

Spending most of her life indoors, she is keenly aware that there are many women that do not consider most outdoor sports simply because they do not have 3 very important things; 1.) Information, 2.) Encouragement and 3.) Inspiration. This has helped define her mission in life, which is to provide these 3 things to women using all platforms made available to her.

Becky Lou in noted in the industry as a contributor to bringing awareness to the women of the world that the door to the Outdoor World is open to each and everyone of them. As a Freelance writer, she contributes stories and product reviews for various online and printed magazines and websites. She organizes women’s hunts across the country, appears for motivational seminars with emphasis on the fact that the door is open, and the Welcome sign is out for women into the Great Outdoors!

She is an avid volunteer for events and workshops teaching and inspiring women into outdoor activities. With her first TV appearance in early 2010, she has since appeared several times, as guest host, featured hunter, and is currently Co-Host of Double Lung Outdoors TV.

Early on she coined and later trademarked the phrase “Camo can be Classy”™, and can often be quoted with her favorite line, “Shooting.. it may be for you, or it may not, but it is definitely worth a Shot!”

From the Windows…to the Walls…Oh Wait… How Prois Becomes the Final Resting Place for Wayward Mounts

By: Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

OK. We have too many windows in our house. Not enough walls.

Let’s face it. We have fabulous views. Amazing sunrises. Gorgeous sunsets. We can gaze out over the ranch and Blue Mesa Reservoir. Yes. We have windows.
Walls? Not so much.

Why is this a problem, you might ask?

We are quite simply out of room. No more room for goat mounts. No more room for Dall sheep mounts. Nope. Don’t even think about another moose…the current moose on the wall will never come down without a divorce decree. And even if it did- I can neither confirm nor deny that it most likely cannot fit out any doors. We still don’t know how we got it inside in the first place. So where would the extra mounts end up? Prois of course.

It dawned on me today that this was becoming problematic while I was cleaning the Prois warehouse (yes…I do this. I am the CEO and I do this. I also clean toilets but that is a story for another day) I was trying to sort through crates and boxes when I kept tripping over some elk mounts conveniently stored here. Yes. Plural. There are two. Sitting on the floor by the bay doors. And trust me, they do not conveniently tuck up close to the wall. Or anything else for that matter.

These suckers have been down here for months now. And let me tell you…they are gorgeous. However, one currently functions as a rack for the broom and shop vac. The other is simply a nuisance and occasionally gores unsuspecting shipping clerks who aren’t on the top of their game. Don’t believe me? Take a peek.

I don’t know how or why they are here, but I am willing to bet this is not how they envisioned their sweet eternity.

Don’t fret. They are not alone. The warehouse and office walls are cluttered with bucks, bulls, geese and mountain lions that found themselves homeless. I have to confess…we even have a bull on the wall that belonged to a friend who just couldn’t take it with him to his new forever home. So I am now in the adoption business. For a limited time, we even had a sheep down here that was perilously close to Bunbun’s cage and resulted in a head-butt each time we fed the rabbit. We had a name for said sheep, but believe it or not we just can’t share that.

I have been working tirelessly to decide what to do with all of these wayward mounts. My 17 year old currently uses the moose at our house for a clothes drying rack. Good idea. But we don’t do laundry down here. So that seems senseless. While functioning as racks for cleaning supplies currently works… it just doesn’t feel majestic. Put them on the wall? Oy…we are out of wall room here too. Toilet paper holders? Eh…this would make a trip to the bathroom a bit perilous and I’m not certain Work Comp covers this.

What’s a girl to do?

Goat Chronicles ~ Kirstie Pike, CEO of Prois Actually Draws a Goat Tag Before She Reaches Medicare Eligibility.

By: Kirstie Pike, CEO Prois Hunting & Field Apparel for Women

It’s no secret…I have had a hankering to hunt goats for years. Many years. When I started applying, I had toddlers. Now I have kids in college. You do the math. With anticipation that rivals that of the birth of the new Royal in Great Britain…I have been waiting to see if I drew my tag.

Not that my goat is more important than William and Kate’s baby. Maybe equal. Maybe.

The conversation went something like this…
(Steve) We should know today if we drew any goat tags. Gonna’ check.
(Me) Cool. However, by the chance I draw said tag I will be too old to go. I think the Division of Wildlife does that on purpose. If the NSA can monitor my every move, I am certain the DOW must be able to calculate my potential increasing age/declining health over time. Once I hit that “golden age”, BAM…I will draw a goat tag when I won’t be physically able to go.(ok…maybe they don’t… this could be a mild tantrum. Sorry, NSA if I have offended you…but you probably knew I was going to write this blog before I started it. I hope you like it!)
(Steve) silence…keyboard clicking… Dude. You drew your tag.
(Me) Wuh? I suppose this means the DOW thinks I’m old and fat.
(Steve) …silence…

Over the past month, Steve has made it quite clear he is tired of my own version of a knock-knock joke…
(Me) Speaking of goats…guess who drew a tag?
(Steve) Um. You?
(Me) Excellent guess! In fact, I DID!
(Steve) Who knew?

OK…so I drew! Finally. After more than a decade of trying, it seems it’s my turn! And so the adventure begins!

The weekend provided great opportunity for some high-peak scouting. Finding ourselves over 12,000 feet gave great opportunity to get a lay of the land…or actually..the precipices. While this is an area with which we are quite familiar, I have to admit…it is WAY more fun to scout for MY goat. After a great day spent scaling the ridges and glassing I am beyond excited to get this hunt underway. I look forward to the physical rigors of this hunt as well as the thrill of the isolation of the high peaks. Stay tuned as we pen the next Goat Chronicles and I will try to keep my exuberance under wraps.

Speaking of goats…guess who drew a tag?